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Possible fix for latency issues for high end NICs / some routers

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NotaRealChimaera

Junior Member

07-10-2014

So a lot of the ping spikes are on riot's behalf, whether they take the blame or not.
However, while digging around on my Atheros manager, I found a setting called "TCP No Delay" which is what decides if your NIC will batch packets before sending to your router, or sometimes having your router batch the packets before going outbound.
In simplest form, TCP No Delay bunches your packets together before sending information out but because of the constant flow of information that league produces, you want to make sure there is no delay from the time the packets are manifested to the time that they are sent. Since the lag spikes started occurring, I did everything I could to weed out any possible problems on my end so that riot couldn't put the blame on anything else. After enabling no delay I went from constant ping spikes ranging between 200 and 500, to a fairly stable 120-135. I'm writing this in Nashville and have never seen ping lower than that.

I know this isn't going to fix everyone's problem and I can't tell you exactly how to find the batching settings on your NIC but it will give you something to look into at least because it is set to batch packets by default. Hope this helps a bit.


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Keizgon

Senior Member

07-10-2014

I'm unfamiliar TCP No Delay, but I would be worried about security issues if you enable it. I'm certain it's off by default for a reason. I wouldn't just enable it and not expect some sort of security risk (DDoS, hack attempt, etc etc).

Just like with DMZ, you don't turn it on because it's only meant to test. You enable DMZ and literally everyone and their dead dog will be hacking you to no end.


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NotaRealChimaera

Junior Member

07-10-2014

It's off by default because in theory it's better for the device to stock packets before throwing them out consistently. In reality, for anything other than intensive gaming it is very unrealistic. The setting has nothing to do with security as it does not modify port auths, doesn't have any special permissions, and doesn't affect your firewall. the DMZ is a completely different layer of the OSI model; It all has to do with your intranet and everything that happens, happens before it goes outbound. It does not open a window.


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