Welcome to the Forum Archive!

Years of conversation fill a ton of digital pages, and we've kept all of it accessible to browse or copy over. Whether you're looking for reveal articles for older champions, or the first time that Rammus rolled into an "OK" thread, or anything in between, you can find it here. When you're finished, check out the boards to join in the latest League of Legends discussions.

GO TO BOARDS


The History of the League of Legends Meta Game (Extremely long post)

Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Pistallion

Senior Member

02-10-2013

Hey guys, I have been working on this essay for a while, and I finally finished it. I wanted to detail the history of the meta game for anyone interested.

here you go!

The History of the League of Legends Meta-Game
And How Riot Designed around the Established Meta Game

This is an attempt to show the different stages of the meta-game of League of Legends and explain why a certain type of meta-game arose. A quick overview of what I plan to cover is the following:
I. Intro: Define “meta-game”
II. Pre-meta and Majority AD carry meta
III. Jungling
IV. Release and after - Tanky DPS bruiser meta and AOE meta
V. First Pro Coverage – WCG and the team fight meta
VI. Pre-Season 1 Championship- Support roam meta
VII. Post Season 1 Championship- “European” or Standard Setup meta and sustain/ farm/ protect the AD carry meta
VIII. Season 2- The after effects of the sustain and farm meta
IX. IEM Kiev- The Russian Rise: Moscow 5 creates the heavy “control the map counter jungle meta”
X. The Rest of Season 2- The Mobility and Power Creep: The death of sustain. Junglers forced into support/ tank role
XI. Conclusion: Riot Makes Drastic Changes to the Game

I. Intro: Defining “Meta-Game”

The prefix “meta” describes a word meaning “beyond, with in, or about.” When we refer to what the “meta-game” is we are talking about the strategies used that one cannot see by simply viewing the game itself. To extract what exactly the meta is, one must observe the different strategies and tactics involved to win the game. In League, this covers champion selection, item builds, lane designations, and most importantly a priority system of objectives on the map. Most players think of the meta as just the lane designation of certain archetypes of champions. When really, it is much more than just what roles go where, but it is the whole approach to the game.
In League, the current meta-game is created when the top players deem a certain strategy superior to the rest. It doesn’t necessarily work 100% of the time, but it is believed to yield the highest chances of winning the game. The reason the meta-game is created by the top players is because they only care about one thing: winning. The strategy that doesn’t have the best chances of yielding positive results is simply thrown out, and strategies taken up by lower level players is not of consideration because it isn’t proven to be the best at the highest, most competitive level. The term “sheep” is usually thrown around, where some players bash other players blindly following top players and never thinking for themselves. This is a great misconception, and in reality, when we see a pro player perform a certain action it simply confirms our suspicions that a certain strategy is the most optimal.
For example, before Ezreal was considered a top pick, most people believe he was one of the worst AD carries in the game. If a player picks up Ezreal and sees amazing results with him, it simply means nothing. Maybe that player has surpassed his current solo queue rating, and is simply out playing the other players. But, when we see top pro player matches, with money on the line, and in these games Ezreal is being picked almost every game, we can conclude that he really is a top pick when it comes to AD carries.
I believe that because certain aspects of the meta are easy to follow, Riot creates champions around a certain meta at the time of the champion’s release. They also release champions that helps bring about a certain aspect they don’t like for the game. Morello said that the design team listens to what the community wants, and more importantly, creates content for what they believe the community needs. This essay is about the history of the League of Legends Meta-Game, but it is also about how Riot caters to established metas and because of this, certain metas are prolonged and established.

II. Pre-Meta

During the early days of League, there was no set “meta-game.” The game was new and fresh and the game itself was designed mainly based off of DotA. The meta isn’t as strict in DotA, so players picked what champions they wanted, and went in any lane they wanted. From the beginning, players realized how powerful a champion that has a full Attack Damage and Attack speed build can become. This concept is an important one, and will later shape other metas greatly, but early on, teams would consist of a huge majority of AD carries.
A very important defining difference in the game’s design from DotA is the fact that mage champions, who mainly use their abilities to cause damage, have the ability to scale into later phases of the game. Riot introduced Ability Power as a statistic, and made each ability with a scaling ratio along with its base damage.
Champions in these early days were designed with three main objectives: thematically fit, able to go into any lane, and able to be relevant at all phases of the game. Here I want to focus on the second part, the ability to go into any lane. The reason for this was because at this time, there wasn’t a set meta where certain champions go into certain lanes. A great example of this is Poppy. In today’s meta, she is nowhere to be seen. She is considered a terrible champion mainly because of the fact that she doesn’t fit the current meta. If you observe the early days of the game, though, you will realize why Poppy was designed the way she was. She works well in a duo lane because of Heroic Charge and Diplomatic Immunity. Most players now would think of her as more of a support champion, meant to go into a side lane, preferably in a duo lane. The problem with Poppy is that she needs a steady gold income to be relevant at all phases of the game, which doesn’t work with the later meta where supports got zero CS. At the same time, if you look at her design, she is very thematically fitting. This idea of theme versus meta fitting will be explored later in Part VII, but I want you to keep in mind how these early champions were designed, having a very strong theme and all being very unique as well.
In this early phase of the game, the meta was taken from DotA, where carries, preferably ranged carries, went mid. This was also affirmed if you look at how some of the carries were designed. Miss Fortune is a great example of a champion that as designed for this certain meta. She is meant to be a lane bully, using her passive to easily weave in and out of the lane, being able to hit creep from afar with Double-Up and to apply the healing debuff with Impure Shots. She also has an AOE spell for wave clearing with Make it Rain, which seemed to be a staple on champions that were designed to go mid. Each early champion had some way to clear a wave with an AOE spell.

III. Jungling

The first sign of players really studying the game and observing a certain optimal strategy was when jungling was introduced. In DotA, heroes can jungle, but in League, players began to realize that a select few champions can start jungling at level 1, and this gave a team a huge advantage. This forced a player into a solo lane, which gave that player more experience and two players from the same team didn’t have to share a gold income. There was a potential gold mine set up in the jungle, not to mention having control of both blue and red buff at all times. This also meant that one player from a team’s whereabouts was unknown and a gank opportunity can happen at any time, giving a team a huge advantage.
Riot seemed to love this idea and went with it from the very beginning. Fiddlesticks, Warwick, and Nunu are examples of early champions solely designed to be in the jungle.

IV. Release and After - Tanky DPS Bruiser Meta and AOE Meta


After the game’s official release, the AD carry meta was still prominent. It was a simple concept, whoever had the better farmed carry won. But players began to realize that because of the low defensive stats of AD carries, if a full team of bruisers fought a full team of carries, the bruisers would win, simply because they can build damage and durability. Hence the next meta was formed: the Tanky DPS meta.
At this time, top players started forming teams, and small tournaments were being formed. This began a new stage in the meta-game: the AOE meta. Because teams of premade 5 players were more common, they can coordinate picks and timing of their abilities. Teams started picking up team compositions filled with a bunch of AOE abilities. Champions such as Nunu, Fiddlesticks, and Kennen, strived during this phase. If you look at the early champions, specifically the 40 original champions upon release, a good amount of them had good AOE abilities.

V. First Pro coverage – WCG and the team fight meta

For the first time in League of Legends history, the players were able to see what was happening at the top of the competitive scene at WCG. Team compositions were more balanced, having a good combination of carries, tanks, supports, and mages. AD carries went mid lane because they needed most farm and levels, mages went in the solo lane because they usually had some sort of crowd control and can escape ganks easier than AD carries. Top was the designated solo lane besides mid because it was the farthest away from dragon. Objectives such as dragon were now seen as important because the pros realized the gold advantage it can give a team. If they wanted to do dragon, the jungler and the two laners on bottom could 3v1 dragon. Bottom lane usually consisted of champions that had a lot of crowd control, usually one being a support champion. Pros realized early how effective supports can be since they needed minimal gold and made laning extremely difficult for the other team.
Games were usually dictated by team fights. Initiating champions such as Amumu and Ramus were considered very good because of this. In solo queue, common bans were Ramus, Amumu, and Shen. The common thinking at the time was that if your team didn’t have an initiator then you would be at a big disadvantage. This would change soon at the Season 1 championship.
At this time, Riot was designing champions to fit this meta as well. Since Tanky DPS was still very prevalent, they released Vayne, a counter to this meta. Vayne also was designed to be able to go mid by herself. Only after a giant slew of nerfs, she became weaker and weaker in the solo lane. Nocturne was a new champion as well, designed for the jungle and a heavy initiator. He was a reliable banned champion in solo queue as well. The community was fed up with the small about of initiating tanks, and wanted a magic damaging tank. Rumble was then released with a great ultimate to initiate with.

VI. Pre-Season 1 Championship- Support Roam Meta

Riot announced that there was going to be an end of season tournament which top players would be able to compete at from around the world. This would also be the highest prize pool seen at tournament so far. This was the beginning of actual established pro League of Legends teams. During the Season 1 qualifier, the support roam meta was formed. Teams realized that supports such as Taric and Alistar needed very little gold income other than the gold per ten items, and could roam and gank lanes, just as a jungler would. This set up virtually three solo lanes, giving their team an even bigger advantage if pulled off correctly. At the time, items such as Heart of Gold, and Philosopher’s Stone can be stacked and the gold per ten second passive wasn’t unique. It was common to see a Taric roaming around with three Heart of Golds, Mobility Boots, a Philosopher’s Stone, and a bunch of wards.
Riot seemed very negative on this meta, and they have every reason for it. Besides the roam meta being bad for the game itself, it was also bad for its business model. If only a very small group of champions can fit the roam meta, then what’s the point of players playing supports that cannot roam. Gold per ten items were now being abused, and commonly each player on the team besides the AD carry would have at least one, even if they weren’t a support.

VII. Post Season 1 Championship- The “European” or Standard Setup meta and Sustain/ Farm/ Protect the AD Carry Meta

In my opinion, the Season 1 Championship was the single most important event that happened in League of Legends history regarding the meta-game. Remnants from this stage of the game still exist in today’s meta, and this event changed League of Legends forever.
During this tournament, there was an observable and obvious difference in how the European teams played compared to the North American teams. The NA teams were still doing the AD mid/ mage top strategy, while the Europeans were doing something never seen before: bottom lane was comprised of a support and a ranged AD carries. Even though the NA teams did relatively well (assumed by the fact that they had the longest experience with the game), the European teams had more success, and Team Fnatic (a European team) eventually were crowned the victors of the tournament. After this tournament, NA teams picked up the EU strategy, and deemed it far superior to anything else. So what did they do that was so important and so revolutionary compared to the past? Was it simply the AD carry/ Support bottom lane? Not exactly. It was the whole team setup composition, what kind of champions went top lane, the unimportance of initiating tanks, and the priority of protecting the AD carry.
As I said before, players early on realized how dominant a farmed ranged carry can become. The Europeans realized this and formed an entire strategy around this simple concept. Because gold per ten items were so good, supports would buy those, and ward up the map. Roaming would eventually become unviable because of some nerfs, and the zero CS support meta was born. On top of the support not having any gold income besides the gold per ten items, the new meta called for a very passive sustain game. Sustain was key to this meta because it focused on farming. The game wasn’t about giant face-offs or tem fights anymore, it was about which team had the most gold. This seemed to be an obvious observation, but it was the central idea that drove this meta. Supports that had healing abilities were used extensively, and bot lane almost always had Soraka or Sona supporting their carry. At the time, there was no counter to this super sustain meta, and the pros knew it. Top lane also called for sustain champs. Jax(spell vamp), Udyr, Irelia, Vladimir, Lee Sin, and Riven(health regen), were popular top laners because they all had sustain. If your champion didn’t have sustain, how were they supposed to trade blows while laning? Initiating tanks were still popular, but not as needed as before. Off-tank champions like Irelia showed dominance. The classic initiating tanks couldn’t lane in this meta, and hence pushed out or put in the jungle. Mages now went mid because of a couple reasons. Firstly, they scaled better than other champions with leveling rather than items. Their burst early and mid-game were supreme, and hence they were branded the title of “AP carry,” believing they would carry the early and mid-game. Because they were ranged made it best in mid lane, and ad carries couldn’t deal with their superior early damage.
This became what is now known as the “Standard Setup” meta. Mage mid, bruiser top, bruiser jungle, and AD carry and support bottom. This meta would last a long time, and is still believed to be the most optimal setup, with some slight deviations, even today. I believe a main reason this meta still exists is because of how logical it is, how easy it is to grasp as a new player, and the fact that Riot catered to this meta in their champion design.
Let’s start with the Yorcik patch in June 2011. Yorick is released, a champion who excels in lane with a sustain ability. Jump ahead to Skarner, a champion designed for the jungle, with sustain. Riven is then released, a great example of a champion trying to fit into the meta. Riven seems to be a solo laner with a bruiser type ability set, but with so sustain. What does Riot do to help her in this meta? They add a great deal of health regen per second. At the time, Riven had the most health regen out of any champion by a good amount. She had to have this high of health regen otherwise she would be deemed unviable and never played. A never played champion is bad for the business model and the game itself.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Pistallion

Senior Member

02-10-2013

VIII Season 2- The after effects of the sustain and farm meta

The game was all about sustain now, and Riot didn’t like it. It promoted boring, slow paced gameplay, and Riot carefully combated it with certain nerfs and new released champions.
The first champion I want to talk about in this period is Graves. Graves is released, a high burst, tanky AD carry. Graves is a lot different than the AD carries released prior, and with his release, a giant meta shift began in the bottom lane, and a trend in champion design started to emerge. Graves was the first AD carry to really “have it all” in regarding scaling, burst, late game steroid, a “one point wonder ability,” and a disengage/ engage ability. This pushed out many other AD carries in and out of viability, and forced certain champions to be buffed and nerfed. The less tweaking of stats, the better, since Riot’s goal is the have a stable game. Graves went through multiple changes, but he changed the dynamic of bot lane for a long time. Burst was king at a time where sustain ruled all. This was a good thing, since it was basically universally agreed upon that too much sustain and burst heals makes the game un-fun. Champions with a lot of burst were now seen in bot lane. An example, Tristana, a champion designed at the game’s release, was now seeing play finally since the AD mid meta. Now more champions were being played, and this was a very good thing for the game and Riot’s business model. This was a reason why this meta became the staple, and Riot ran with it.
At this time, the jungle got a rework. Riot realized how little champions were viable in the jungle, and so they made the jungle camps a lot easier to kill with faster spawn times. This was the first time where basically any champion in the game can actually jungle starting at level one. Besides the fact that there was a small selection of champions that can jungle, the new jungle made ganking much more often since junglers now had to spend less time in the jungle. This forced all laners to start boots, and was the first sign of the mobility meta in which I will discuss later.
Starting from the Graves patch, we can see which champions fit the current meta, and which didn’t. Shyvana was released after Graves, and despite being an innately tanky champion, she was seen as a lower-tier champion because she didn’t seem to fit the meta at the time. In top lane, she had no sustain, and in the jungle she couldn’t gank. Fizz was then released, a champion that was a direct counter to the sustain meta, with grievous wounds being applied with one of his abilities. Volibear came next, with a great sustain passive and a ganking tool to fit the meta. Ahri came after, a champion that greatly fit the meta, with a sustain passive, and high mobility. Then Viktor, Sejuani, Nautilus, Ziggs, Fiora, and Lulu, all of which tried to fit into the meta. Sejuani with her ganking ability, Nautilus with his jungle clear and ganking ability, Fiora with her sustain passive, and Lulu, a champion specifically designed for the zero CS support meta. Most of these champions, however, didn’t actually see much play in the competitive scene. (Ziggs had some play upon his release, but got nerfed). The reason for this was because at this time, the meta began to shift very fast, and upon the next big meta shift seen at IEM Kiev, most of these champions became unviable, and the champion who was initially seen as unviable, Shyvana, set up the next big meta shift, and the groundwork for the rest of season 2 and the mobility meta. But before talking about what happened with the meta at IEM Kiev, I want to talk about some of the champions that were designed thus far.
Theme has always been a very important part of each champion’s design. If you look at the early champions, all of them were thematically heavy. Janna being a wind goddess, Tristana the girl with the big gun, Ashe the frost archer, etc. I’m not saying that the later champions lacked theme, though. What I am saying, however, is that theme was king in the beginning, and Riot made unique champions regardless of the meta. Riot liked the new meta that was created at the Season One Championship, and ran with it. What I mean by that is that now we begin to see somewhat cookie cutter champions. What do I mean by this? Well first off, now that certain champions went into certain lanes, and roles such as AD carry, support, AP carry and jungler were created. Players began to fall into their certain role they liked best. Mid players focused on mages and concentrated on becoming skilled with mage champions. People who liked AD carries now only focused on AD carries. Players went from playing certain champions i.e. “Hey I can play Garen, Annie, Ashe, Lee Sin and Janna,” now to certain roles i.e. “Hey, I play AD carry.”
This was good for Riot because of their business model. Each role had many champions that each player can play as, and Riot continually made champions like this. Support seemed to be lacking on certain champions, hence Riot released Lulu. Lulu, is a great champion to point out. She is a champion specifically designed to fit into the zero CS support meta, having a complete ability kit very useful without any items.
Unlike DotA, League has no way of forcing players to play multiple roles, like how DotA has many popular different game types like All Random, or Random Draft (League has all random and now ARAM, but it is considered non-competitive). What we began to see, like I said before, was the cookie cutter champions. Champion ability kits were now more similar. The “Q” ability was the “bread and butter” ability, their “W” was the utility ability, etc. Now players who, for example, played bruisers, can now play all bruisers, because there is a sense of familiarity to the ability kits. Think about it, how different is the gameplay of Xin Zhao from Pantheon, or Syndra from any other mage champion?

IX. IEM Kiev- The Russian Rise: Moscow 5 creates the heavy “control the map counter jungle meta”

In January 2012, IEM Kiev took place. Moscow 5, a team that hadn’t made their name in the competitive world yet, would change how the game would be played. As I said before, Shyvana, an unlikely champion to change the game, would be the main choice for Moscow 5’s jungler, Diamondprox. It seemed strange that Shyvana was picked so much, because previously she was known as a fast jungle clearer, but a terrible ganker. Diamondprox also abused an in-game bug on Shyvana’s Burnout ability, where damage was being applied a short duration after the ability should have ran out. What this did was make her jungle clear much faster than any jungler in the game. At the time, no one stood a chance against her jungle speed on top of her movement speed bonus. Dr. Mundo wasn’t buffed yet, and most players deemed him unviable in competitive play. Because of her jungle speed, Diamondprox showed how efficient she was at clearing the jungle camps, and being able to control so much of the other team’s jungle as well. This super-fast gameplay and jungle control was eventually picked up by other teams, but Moscow 5 showed complete dominance in their first tournament simply because they were ahead of the curve for any competitive team.
With the change to the jungle early in season 2, the opposite of what Riot wanted to happen, happened. Riot intended for the bigger possibility of more champions in the jungle, but with the new meta of fast clear times and jungle control, there became only a very small amount of champions that jungled well. Shyvana, Dr. Mundo, Maoki, and Skarner where well ahead of any other champion in regards to clear time. This small meta shift of jungle control helped push forward the established meta-game seen in the rest of season 2, which can be explained by the term “mobility creep.”

X. The Rest of Season 2- The Mobility and Power Creep: The death of sustain. Junglers forced into support/ tank role

The jungle was now extremely easy to clear, and each camp spawned very quickly, giving very small amount of gold. Players that weren’t jungling realized this and would steal camps while in lane phase to get a small gold advantage. This meant that junglers were now even more starved for gold, and hence had to choose between building straight damage or straight tank. Because all of the viable junglers were melee, they had to fill the tank and supportive role. Compositions were still revolving around the AD carry, and if a jungler didn’t build defensive, they would be blown up in no time in team fights. What this meant for champion selection was the fact that now an extremely small pool of champions was considered viable junglers. Shyvana, Lee Sin, Dr. Mundo, Skarner, Cho’Gath, Maokai, Nocturne, and Nautilus were really the only viable junglers. They cleared fast and will be very useful building pure tank.
The jungle also called for ganks very often. Because the camps offered so little gold, junglers were forced to gank a lot more often. This meant oracle’s were bought very early, and mobility boots became extremely popular on junglers now along with the movement speed increases in the defensive and utility mastery trees. Junglers would sit on two gold per ten items, and camp lanes all the time. What did this mean for laners? Everyone in the game now had to start with boots as their first item. If they didn’t the jungler would be able to gank so much easier. Besides this, high mobility carries were needed. Mid lane saw a shift to hard to gank champions, or someone that can build somewhat tanky, like Ryze. The prevalence of slows were so high, now, almost every champion has some sort of slow, and every top tier jungler did as well (or even hard CC), making position less useful. Gap closers were extremely popular on champions now as well. Udyr was a prime victim of both of these, as he fell out of flavor pretty badly towards the end of season two.
I want to discuss each lane now, as I have discussed the jungle. Starting with mid lane, as I said, hard to gank or tanky champions were being picked now. The most popular AP champions were now they very supportive champions such as Orianna and Anivia. AD carries did so much of the damage late, that supportive AP carries became king. Solely burst champions fell greatly out of flavor, such as Annie and Brand, as they could were too susceptible to ganks, and utility simply outshined them.
If you look at the design of the later mage champions, we can see a trend that was formed. Take for example, Ahri, Orianna, and Zyra, three of the later mage champions released. All of them have avoidable damage and/or crowd control. This meant it was so important for champions to be mobile, hence pushing the mobility creep even more ahead. New mage design focused on better timed execution, rather than good positioning of the older mage champions.
For bottom lane, sustain was basically dead, thanks to nerfs. Soraka and Sona were once the very best supports, now had been pushed out for more burst and CC oriented supports. Leona and Taric were used more now. Lulu and even Sona were still being used a lot because of their ability to protect their carries with their ultimates. Nunu became extremely popular since Kiev simply because Blood Boil made any AD carry into a complete monster by end game, on top of being very hard to gank thanks to the extreme movement speed Blood Boil granted. Janna was a lot rarer now, as her laning became worse and worse (due to some nerfs).
AD carry wise, three main carries emerged as the very best. Ezreal needs to be mentioned as he was, before some nerfs, the king of AD carries. Over time, Riot slowly buffed Ezreal. He wasn’t ever seen in the early metas simply because of his lack of damage late game, and his very high mana costs. Riot slowly gave him some help in the mana costs, and eventually people began to realize how good he really was. His Essence Flux dealt a very high amount of damage just based on the base stats. On top of that, it provided an attack speed buff/debuff for teammates or the enemy. Attack speed debufs area extremely powerful in the way they are calculated, and players realized how powerful Ezreal is in lane. As for his late game, his passive is a nice help, and along with slowing the entire enemy team’s attack speed made him so great.
Because of the mobility creep and immense amount of gap closers, carries now had to have some sort of disengage to be effective. Ezreal’s Arcane Shift is considered to be the best escape ability in the game. Looking ahead to the other two top tier carries, Graves and Corki also had very good escapes as well. These three champions, Graves, Corki, and Ezreal would be deemed as the “Holy Trinity” of AD carries. On top of all having escapes, their early, mid, and late game scaling was all very good. They did so much more than other carries, and hence picked almost every single game in competitive play.
In top lane, sustain was basically dead as well. Notable new champions released for top lane was Darius and Jayce. Jayce fit the meta very well, as he was ranged and very mobile. He was very hard to gank, and traded in lane extremely well. Darius, on the other hand, was slow and somewhat easy to gank, but to compensate for this, he was given one of the most powerful ultimates in the game. Why was sustain dead, and how does a champion like Udyr basically fall off the map, even in top lane? Champions like Jax, Olaf, Darius, and Jayce all had a very good time dueling other champions. Instead of worrying about having sustain so they could trade blows, top laners had to worry about flat out dying. Top laners also had to have a high amount of presence in a team fight because AD carries were so mobile now. If you look at the top laners I mentioned, these champions are a force in team fights. This general idea of top lane was termed “Power Creep.”
It is worth mentioning that at the end of season two, team-play and tower pushing/ map control became a meta. The Asian teams dominated the Season 2 championship, and had similar tactics. It wasn’t a total meta shift, but it’s worth mentioning. Teams also implemented strategies dealing with the AD carry and support going top to force a 2v1 against the enemy top laner.

IX. Conclusion: Riot Makes Drastic Changes to the Game

Before writing this, I was going to dive into Season 3 and its metas, but because of how fast the game is changing, I am going to leave it alone. Basically, in Pre-Season 3, Riot made a giant amount of changes to the game. As we all aware of them, you can read much more about them in the original posts from Morello and Xypherous.

Thank you for reading this, and I hope I helped any of you understand of how certain metas were formed throughout the history of this awesome game.

-Pistallion

No TL: DR, it’s just too long. Check the top page for the sections of this essay.

References:
http://leagueoflegends.wikia.com/wiki/League_of_Legends_Wiki
The wiki, for tons of material I covered

http://timeline.leagueoflegends.com/
The LoL timeline, to help me with champion releases and stuff like that

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nlrf7E72-GM
This video helped me learn about some of the early stages of the game

Shout out to Irrational Noob, a fellow player and awesome support who helped me with some ideas I had. I also referenced his post about Season 2 and the mobility creep here: http://na.leagueoflegends.com/board/showthread.php?t=2590930


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Pistallion

Senior Member

02-10-2013

Reseved for Update History


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Tadashe

Senior Member

02-10-2013

WatTtTt??T?


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Chompey

Senior Member

02-10-2013

Wow, that post must've taken you a lot of effort. Very nice job.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

iMRts

Senior Member

02-10-2013

WatTtTt??T?


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Khmer Dude

Senior Member

02-10-2013

I just scrolled down. :I


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Pistallion

Senior Member

02-10-2013

Quote:
Chompey:
Wow, that post must've taken you a lot of effort. Very nice job.


Yeah it took me a couple weeks. I hope some of you guys read it and comment on it!


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

notanxj9smurf

Member

02-10-2013

inb4TLDR


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Silvereagle11

Senior Member

02-10-2013

Give this man a medal

A Historian medal