Lore Creation Tips v1.0

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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-09-2012

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Index:
Beginner Tips
Intermediate Tips
Advanced/Expert Tips



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DISCLAIMER: This is not my Lore review thread. If you wish for me to review your lore or if you need assistance with lore please post on my main page by clicking here. This thread also contains a list of all my works and explains a little more about me. I think that it is a good example of whether or not I have merit in this topic.

If you have any questions regaring Lorecrafting you may ask me via my Lorecrafting AMA thread.
Have you ever had a champion idea, but you had no idea how to write his lore? You have the abilities, the stats, even the skins and their voice. But it is missing the most important part: the story.

For me lore is the most essential element of champion creation. I love creative writing, I don't like this kind of writing because people say I have no organization in this style. But hey this style isn't my forte, and I never said it was. My forte is coming up with a creative story and then making everything fit around it. For me I don't have a step by step guide that I follow when I write lore. Ideas just pop into my head and I start writing, and although not every draft is perfect it is always a step in the right direction. Because in my opinion, it is better to write something than nothing at all. At least you made an effort to make mistakes and took risks. That is far better than some people who are afraid of people saying that their stuff stinks.

So how can I help you if I don't have a step by step guide? Well I developed one just for you here and now as I wrote this (just how I do everything else: on the spot). There are lots of things to do before we start so lets get to work:

Allow me to first establish some rapport with you the reader and identify any questions, qualms, and/or concerns that you may or may not happen to have. This section is also known as the FAQ section.
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FAQ:

Q. What makes you an expert at Lorecrafting!?
A. Oh, but I'm not an expert at Lorecrafting, I merely love writing it. Never have I ever thought I was the best Lorecrafter out there. Nor do I think my champions are the best.

Q. Then what gives you the right to give us advice, what makes you think your advice is worth anything?
A. My advice is based off of several key things that all lore must have. What I feel is that Lore needs these certain things to exist: Champions, Champion Info, Plot: (Beginning, Rising Action, Middle/Climax/Crisis Point, Resolving Action, Ending), League Motivation (which is usually closer to the ending and I'll get to why later), Theme, and of course their special ability. These are crucial aspects of your lore and are definitely necessary. In addition I mention later in the Intermediate Section about Mood and Theme. Of course without these your lore becomes dull, boring, or lackluster.

Q. So you aren't an expert yet in section 3 you claim to give expert advice what gives?
A. Well in the expert section I only make reminders to fellow Lorecrafters as you will see and even this can be construde as giving valuable advice. Whether they like my tips/advice from that section is purely up to them. I also give Advanced tips in that section so I touch on both grades of writing. Also calling it Expert Tips is a misnomer, as I say in the first sentence of the section if you are in fact an expert Lorecrafter then you should probably apply to Riot and not be reading a Tips Thread. Unless of course you are here to add in your own input.

Q. Oh, so if I have input as to things I think you should add since I feel that I am relatively decent at Lorecrafting, I should just post them here then?
A. Sure I am always open to valuable feedback that can improve my work, as I say nothing is perfect and everything can be improved.
Now lets begin with several questions that will aid you as a newer writer to establish your character. If you are past this point you may skip this part of the section and move on to the next part where we begin a Lorecrafting Workshop.

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Question 1. What is your champion's Name?
It is hard to write lore when you don't even have something to call your champion now isn't it? And try giving him a title while you are at it! And even a description helps too.

Question 2. Where is your champion from?
All stories need settings, if you are having trouble figuring out where your champion is from I suggest taking your pick from anywhere on the Valoran Map. A champion's setting is very important so be sure to read up on their setting so that you have valid researched data regarding where they are from. I.E. If you say they are from the void make sure you realize that much of the void is undefined and unknown. So if you are going to create a story revolving around that, you should make it dark and mysterious quite similar to what it really is.

Question 3. Where does there allegiance fall?
Noxian, Demacian, Ionian, Zaun, etc. What banners do they fly? Are they good or bad?

Question 4. What kind of Champion are you making?
A list of viable options can be found here on Poet Ultima's thread about Archetypes.

Question 5. What does your champion wield as a weapon, and is it something they are notable for?
If so this is something worth adding in to the lore.
Decide if they wield a sword or an axe, or maybe they wield fire or ice!? If you are having trouble with typical physical weapons I suggest taking a look at Poet Ultima's thread that indexes a great amount of weaponry.

Question 6. What is your champion's reason for joining the league?
This is usually a crucial question to answer and is sometimes the entire theme behind the lore. e.g. Graves and TF rivalry. Although this doesn't have to be your entire lore, but it is definitely a question you should answer.

Question 7. How did they get their abilities?
Was it through magic water? Was it through the void? Were they consumed by fire and became fire itself? This is a good basis for starting lore although it doesn't have to be your central point, but it is a question that needs answered.

Question 8. Does your champion interact with other champions?
If so how? And how do they feel about them? What causes them to feel that way. Why do they know them? Does it make sense that your champion knows them e.g. being from the same country, studying beneath the same teacher, etc? This also goes for regular character interactions as well. Who is this new person, and why are they interacting the way they are? Do they like or hate your champion? Make sure all of your interactions are explained, we can't just go and say "Byr knew all the members of the League so he joined it."
Answering these 8 questions allows you to start planning your lore. It is now time to begin our Lorecrafting.

Lorecrafting Workshop:

As with all stories we need a beginning, middle, and end.

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Beginning: In this part of the lore we generally introduce our champion and setting. However this does not mean you have to reveal his name yet. You could add suspense here and keep the reader on edge (yes we already know his name by reading the title of the thread, but doing this makes it have a cool sound at the end when you finally introduce him.)

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Examples of this would be: A young boy alone in the dark cold rain, silently staring out at the horizon while standing at the front door of his Ionian home, waiting patiently for his parents to return home from Demacia and to him.
So here we have established the character as being a young boy, he lives in Ionia, and we know his parents are away in Demacia. This last part lets us set up a rising action to the middle of our story where the main crisis/climax occurs. At the crisis/climax our character usually undergoes the cause of his powers or the reason that sends him to the league. Some champions have relatively simple reasons like being part of the Noxian army and they wish to thwart Demacia on the fields of justice. Others can be more towards a story arc where they died were brought back to life and decided to cheat death forever by joining the league. It can be as overly complex or simple as you please. Remember it is your lore
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Middle: So now we have a beginning, we need to establish that crisis or turning point or climax. However you want to call it. Generally you have a rising action that leads up to this.

One does not simply say:

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"A young boy alone in the dark cold rain, silently staring out at the horizon while standing at the front door of his Ionian home, waiting patiently for his parents to return home from Demacia and to him.
And then follow it with something like:

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"But then his parents died and so he got mad and grew four arms, and then he got mad and killed people and then the league captured him and forced him to fight for them."
First of all that is really badly written, and the reason for that is to show that plot matters. You are leaving out all the juicy details. How did the little boy with four arms kill people?! Who killed his parents!? Sure its another 'oh no my parents died as a boy i'm batman' story arc but I am writing this on the fly and trying to come up with an example.

So how could you better write the next part? Well you could start by dressing the words up and including details.

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"Word finally arrived one day that on their way home from Demacia, his parents were brutally murdered by bandits from Zaun known strictly as the "Wet-bandits". Distraught with grief, the young boy took his fist and punched a barrel that was lying near his house with all of his might. The barrel broke spilling green goo all over his arms. Suddenly the young boy realized that the barrel was in fact a barrel of bio-chemicals left over from the battles of Ionian and Zaun forces. He quickly tried to wipe off the horrid smelling toxin, but within seconds his arms started tingling and burning. Doubling over in pain he rushed to a nearby puddle of water and washed as much of the poisonous goo off of his body quickly as possible. But it was to no avail, his body began to suddenly change as his arms split apart into two. He looked down at his reflection only to realize he was now a four armed monster! But more importantly he was a strong four armed monster. It seemed that the toxins had modified not only his genetic structure but his muscular structure as well. With his new found strength he set out to find the Zaun bandits."
Alright now this is probably a little better. But that is more than likely because I wrote the first one as badly as I could. Are there mistakes? Sure. Am I going to spend another hour trying to find them? Not tonight...
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Ending: This part usually holds the final choice to join the league. And the reason that I say this is because the champion has usually completed their travels prior to joining the league. With the exception of Jax of course.

For example: The reason you find your keys in the last place you look, is because you don't keep looking after you find your keys.

Likewise with champions they aren't going to join the league and then go get their powers it just doesn't work like that.


So now we have had our crisis and our champion is ready to resolve down to joining the league but we can't just say that:

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And so he killed everyone he found, and when the league found out they captured him and used him in the fields of justice.
We could obviously improve this. Maybe try something like this:

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His search led him throughout all of Zaun for signs of bandits, and any unfortunate enough to cross his path brutally had their hearts ripped out of their chests. And though he found many bandits none of them seemed to have any knowledge of the so-called "Wet-Bandits". Finally one day he stumbled across a group of bandits in the midst of robbing a stage coach. He quickly ran down to the coach and approached the biggest, baddest, bandit of the group and asked them if they were the "Wet-Bandits". The man scoffed at the freak and replied, "Yea, and what's it to ya?!". With a quick jab, his extra hand plunged into the man's chest and the man with four arms replied, "My name is Byr, you killed my parents and it means everything to me! Soon after, news of Byr's strength quickly reached the Institute's attention, they hurriedly sent all available summoners to Ionia in attempts to gain his acceptance to the league. Needless to say they did not truly realize his full potential.
Now it is lengthy but it sounds better plus it has another action point. Plus we resolve here by giving the champion his name and having him take revenge on the people who essentially started this. And with that little exercise we have ourselves a completed lore
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Combined Lore:
"A young boy alone in the dark cold rain, silently staring out at the horizon while standing at the front door of his Ionian home, waiting patiently for his parents to return home from Demacia and to him. Word finally arrived one day that on their way home from Demacia, his parents were brutally murdered by bandits from Zaun known strictly as the "Wet-bandits". Distraught with grief, the young boy took his fist and punched a barrel that was lying near his house with all of his might. The barrel broke spilling green goo all over his arms. Suddenly the young boy realized that the barrel was in fact a barrel of bio-chemicals left over from the battles of Ionian and Zaun forces. He quickly tried to wipe off the horrid smelling toxin, but within seconds his arms started tingling and burning. Doubling over in pain he rushed to a nearby puddle of water and washed as much of the poisonous goo off of his body quickly as possible. But it was to no avail, his body began to suddenly change as his arms split apart into two. He looked down at his reflection only to realize he was now a four armed monster! But more importantly he was a strong four armed monster. It seemed that the toxins had modified not only his genetic structure but his muscular structure as well. With his new found strength he set out to find the Zaun bandits. His search led him throughout all of Zaun for signs of bandits, and any unfortunate enough to cross his path brutally had their hearts ripped out of their chests. And though he found many bandits none of them seemed to have any knowledge of the so-called "Wet-Bandits". Finally one day he stumbled across a group of bandits in the midst of robbing a stage coach. He quickly ran down to the coach and approached the biggest, baddest, bandit of the group and asked them if they were the "Wet-Bandits". The man scoffed at the freak and replied, "Yea, and what's it to ya?!". With a quick jab, his extra hand plunged into the man's chest and the man with four arms replied, "My name is Byr, you killed my parents and it means everything to me! Soon after, news of Byr's strength quickly reached the Institute's attention, they hurriedly sent all available summoners to Ionia in attempts to gain his acceptance to the league. Needless to say they did not truly realize his full potential."
I realize that this probably isn't the best of lore but it shows how to go from start to finish. Remember to add details. Details are the spice of life when it comes to champion lore. Of course if you are having trouble you can always feel free to contact me for Lore assistance via my main thread. Click here to go to my main thread.

Thanks for your time and I will be sure to update this thread with more tips later as time allows.


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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-09-2012

Intermediate Tips:

So you have read all of my basic tips and want to advance to an intermediate level yes?

Well by now if you are an intermediate Lore Writer than you have perfected your early development answering all of those questions in the previous section with great ease. At this point you are pretty much ready to write the lore, but you do not know where to start story wise or you are suffering from minor creativity blocks.

Key Tip: Don't Panic!

Like Douglas Adams says throughout HHGTTG: Don't Panic. Creative blocks happen to everyone, including even me.

So what can you do? Well if you follow my advice here you should be well on your way to having an entire story at your hands, but you just need that one way of telling it. In this section I will talk about the Tone of your lore and how you can effectively tell a story. Also you will find tips and advice for how to effectively brainstorm and organize your thoughts in a story fashion.

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Originally Posted by Wikipedia

Tone: is a literary technique that is a part of composition, which encompasses the attitudes toward the subject and toward the audience implied in a literary work. Tone may be formal, informal, intimate, solemn, somber, playful, serious, ironic, anguilty, to condescending, or many other possible attitudes. Each piece of literature has at least one theme, or central question about a topic, and how the theme is approached within the work is known as the tone.

Difference Between Tone And Mood:

Tone and mood are not the same, although variations of the two words may on occasions be interchangeable terms. The tone of a piece of literature is the speaker's or narrator's attitude towards the subject, rather than what the reader feels, as in mood. Mood is the general feeling or atmosphere that a piece of writing creates within the reader. Mood is produced most effectively through the use of setting, theme, voice and tone.

Basically, tone is the narrator's feelings toward the story, and mood is yours.
So what does all that mean in non literature jargon?! Well essentially how the writer wants the story to sound versus how the writer wants the reader to feel.

What can I give as an example?
i.e. Noir (or Noire). Noir is a tone that sets the theme for how the story sounds. "It was a dark night, all the other cats had skaddled off by now, but then out of the blue she walked in. That's when I knew I had to drop all my other cases. The rain still fresh on her jacket, she was as soaking wet as a cat in a bath." So are first thought here is obviously detective story because that is a very typical cliche to have in old black and white style movies. What does this do to the theme and the mood you ask? Well this sets up an overall vocalization to the narrator creating a very established rhythm since it is a very well known theme. It is almost as if you say "William Shatner", instantaneously your speech becomes very staccato. It is something that is just associated with how we remember and relate characters.

How can you affect the mood?
Well if it is light comedy or a divine tragedy, you can take your methods from your tone of course. You can inspire horrific grief by creating such a detailed scene that revolves purely around the champion's loss of his loved one. Or you can add humorous moments to your character using puns, slapstick, or other methods of comedy.

Can I give you an example of this?
Notice how in the lore from the previous section how I created a dark and bitter atmosphere where our champion Byr ruthlessly murdered bandit after bandit. In this lore the Tone is very somber at the beginning, but quickly the tone changes towards actiony with the simple established theme of revenge. Readers look at this and if they relate to the tragedy may feel empowered, or if they find the action cool then the mood becomes excitement rather than sadness.

You mentioned brainstorming?
Oh yes I did let me see if I have something for you...ooh yes a wonderful educational link. Click here.

Will you update this thread again with more details?
Yes, and in addition I plan on organizing this thread a lot better with even indexing for QoL.


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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-10-2012

Section 3. Expert Tips

If you are considering yourself an expert than you probably do not need tips from me, and you should probably apply to Riot for a job. But have no fear this section is for those people who understand all the key aspects of writing but they just have trouble with getting started.

Maybe you are an Expert Lorecrafter. Even so all lore comes with mistakes because we are all human and we all make them. My lore is not always perfect. In fact I am fairly sure I could fix some comma usage here and there on some of my stories. Some times I scrap entire stories just because I didn't think they fit the original theme that I wanted. And that is fine, I even document my mistakes as posts. This serves two purposes, the first one and most important one is that each one of those posts shows the exact time and date that I made the fix so I don't have to clutter my main concept with an update log, and the second is it simultaneously bumps my thread. I know its horrible but I would rather post the changes I have made as bumps rather than actually bumping my thread because the latter seems needy. In spite of that I do love having my thread in the top ten posts, but hey thats just because I am so excited to hear what people think of my stuff. Frankly who isn't? Now enough ranting on to the tip giving.




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Advanced to Expert Tips:

Tip 1. Check it twice, Check it thrice, Check it again, and then have a friend check it.
It is very crucial to proofread, we all make mistakes, they happen even to me. I understand we aren't perfect and I am not expecting everything from you or me to be crystal clear on your first draft. This is what feedback is for!

Tip 2. Don't take feedback to heart, only take it in consideration.
What this means is that the reviewer isn't here to insult you or your work, merely they are trying to identify the faults that you made for you. So remember it is usually constructive criticism and not just a total bash (however, this may be untrue in specific situations). With this in mind remember to reply kindly and thank them for their feedback because they just spent a great deal of time reading your work. And a little appreciation goes a long way. Just how you want your stuff to be noticed, each reviewer more than likely wants their thoughts noticed. (Usually it is general courtesy to review one of their concepts, but if you aren't good at writing reviews then you don't have to worry about it. I wasn't good at writing reviews at first but then I developed my own system called Lore PQWER to help me rate concepts and since then it has been working quite well.)

Tip 3. If you make changes to your work, document it.
This allows readers to see that you are dedicated and are constantly trying to improve based on your feedback. And if you do make changes based on feedback it is usually common courtesy to give a shoutout to the person who informed you of the need for a change. e.g. "updated spell tooltip to better clarify what spell actually does, thanks to feedback from Wulffe."

Tip 4. Challenge yourself.
If you are uncertain about whether people will like it enter it into a contest! This is a great way to see what people think of it. Plus this forces you to try and stick to a standard theme set by somebody else. This truly tests your writing skills. I know from experience from writing for other people. Sometimes getting that theme just write can be difficult. In a couple cases I had to do several drafts before I liked the final work and felt it was acceptable to give to the concept creator.

For now I am out of tips because I have to go run and write some lore for a new concept so be sure to check back here soon for more updates.
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Links to avoid common errors:
Disclaimer: homonymn link has several words in the list that may not be appropriate for younger readers. Read at your own risk.

Common Avoidable Errors.

Subject vs. Object Pronouns

List of commonly confused homonymns and their definitions

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Story Arcs:

I post this in the expert tips because this is a more advanced topic and master Lorecrafters should take this next section into consideration when writing new lore.

I quote Katsuni here because her guide on Champion Creation is remarkable, and I wanted to give a special shout out to them. Katsuni says somewhere in her massively large guide that there are approximately 20 single unique plots. Well although that may be true and leave us for no room for originality, we can always innovate. This isn't saying Katsuni is wrong, this is merely saying you need to read her words closely. Even she herself explains what I explain in great detail. I am just merely re-emphasizing the points in my own way. However, let it be said that Moby the White intends to create something entirely original at one point here rather than copypasta some old lame story arc.

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Primary Question: You have to ask yourself what is my main story arc? Or more precisely what is my plot?

Answer: Well in order to do this you must first understand what plot is, if you don't understand I suggest going through this guide again and reading each section. In short to skip all that work, essentially plot is how the story plays out. Plot includes the Beginning/Introduction, Rising Action, Middle/Climax, Resolving Action, and Ending/Conclusion. Now earlier we discussed how to go about each section. Now we are discussing how each section is specific to a single 'arc'.

Secondary Question: So what is a 'Story Arc'?

Answer: Well this is what wiki says about Story Arcs. What you can infer from this is that a story arc is the method of taking a character from one point to another. In plot we do this through several ways, usually they are quite similar hence the whole idea that there is no such thing as unique theme. But I will address that later. I could also touch base on the whole concepts of Canons but I will let wikipedia handle that as well.

Primary Question: How many plot lines, or story arcs exist?
Answer: Ronald Tobias wrote a book that suggests there are 20 master plots coinciding with what Katsuni says. I for one have never read the book so I can't say for certain that it is accurate. Are there basic plots? Of course there are. So the question is what makes the basic plot? When it comes right down to its source what defines our overall plots? The answer my friends is simple. Crisis or Conflict. There is a reason I call it the Crisis point. Now is the time to explain why.

Secondary Question: Okay you got me Moby, now tell me why?!!!!
Answer: Easy, all will be explained. Allow us to take into consideration the previous story for a moment. If we remove the crisis of his parents dying what are we left with? Answer: a lonely little boy home alone. I might as well be reading a story about my childhood. Geeze I'd be bored out of my mind. All the reader would hear is "Blah blah blah blah blah little kid....blah blah joined the league." What kind of person wants to read that garbage?! No one thats who. Without some crisis point, without some climax, without ANY action whatsoever your lore becomes lackluster and boring.

Sub-Secondary Question: What about so and so's lore their's has no action but I found it really interesting?
Answer: Well, first allow me to clarify action. Action-any event that occurs that catches your readers' attention whether it be comedy, tragedy, mystery, or etc. There are various methods of obtaining your readers' focus. That lore probably utilized one of these tactics. It was not in any shape way or form a bland factoidal sheet saying where they came from and what powers they have. That is not lore. That is half-hearted garbage with no descriptives whatsoever, that is a lifeless empty void that not even Malzahar or Kassadin would dare enter for fear of becoming boring. From what I hear, this is the type of nonsense that is currently coming out of our current Lorecrafters' hands, and this makes me sad as a Lorecrafter. I cannot express how important it is to give life to your story-without life your story can not possibly bring your champion to life for the reader. So why would your readers want in any way to continue reading? Answer: They wouldn't.

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Reviewing Lore:
Lorecrafting as an artform is something that goes unappreciated, most people who frequent this forum usually ignore lore when doing a review for somebody. I've seen countless cases of amazing PQWER reviews, but it is not too often that I see a decent lore review. Generally I witness comments such as: "really good lore", "loved the lore.", "love the story", or "lore needs work.". To be fair I've seen similar reviews for concepts in general an example of such is: "cool concept would buy.". These types of reviews lack in effort and advice. Allow me to help you help your fellow lorecrafter. I call this technique something else personally (****burger), but in the real world we can't call it that. So allow me to introduce the "Feedback sandwhich". You don't know what to say directly to the author about anything particular so you want to give them feedback: First you give them positive feedback detailing an area where you thought they excelled. Second you hand them a piece of negative feedback, but in the form of constructive criticism, telling them where they can improve. Finally you give them another piece of positive feedback detailing how overall you felt the idea was good.

This is just one way to deliver a negative message so that readers don't become offended. Another method is turning your negatives into a positive. "I felt that your character was extremely boring and dull; however, when he killed that ogre I felt that you really managed to convey an epic scene of vivid imagery." Now wasn't that better than "cool story"? I think so.

Another point: You don't have to be a master of spelling and grammar to read lore and analyze it for mistakes. While you are reading a sentence ask yourself this question- Does this sound right, or do I have to reread it again to make sense out of it? If the answer is you have to reread it over and over, then there is more than likely an error in that sentence. Tell the author this, "I couldn't quite grasp the one sentence where you character did insert action here could you please explain it to me?"

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Credits:

Author: Moby White aka "Moby the White"

General Thanks to the following users:
Katsuni for posting advice and being used as a reference in expert tips
Poet Ultima for giving me the idea essentially
Wulffe for being my feedback giver in this Section


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Katsuni

Senior Member

12-10-2012

For a quick few additions:

Ask yeurself whot yeur champion's motivation is for joining the league. Does it make actual sense why the league would be a better choice than somewhere else such as Piltover or Zaun, both of which are good at hooking people up with knowledge? Is it something they bought into as a deal for more power or something only the institute of war could provide? Regardless, yeu want to ensure that there's a valid reason for why they're at the league.

A good in game example of this is Riven; she was betrayed, and she can't take over Noxus by herself, but she can lead by example on a world stage.

A bad example in game is Hecarim, who honestly has no real reason to be at the league at all.




Additionally, just because yeu WANT to be in the league, doesn't mean they have much reason to let yeu in. Just being powerful isn't enough; there has to be reason for them to specifically want yeu present as a member. Cho'gath is on a leash to study how void creatures work. Shaco's kept because it's about the only time he's not off killing someone and they can't keep him out of trouble otherwise. Nidalee's there because she's literally the only one representing many of the areas south of the great barrier. Hecarim's there because it was in the script. Yes, his lore sucks, and yes, I'm going to keep ragging on them for it endlessly.

The point is, there should be a reason that the league actually wants someone to be present. Someone like Jarvan IV, or General Darius, are major political figureheads which give additional credit to the league in general; if they're beating the **** out of each other in person on the fields of justice, they're not screwing up the countryside with large scale wars. This is exactly the purpose of the league, so they're great to have around!

Random champions like Orianna, however, didn't have any particular reason to be present. In fact, her living counterpart tried so hard, yet was so inept that she DIED trying to get in. To this, the only reason they let in her mechanical reproduction, was honestly out of political pressure since it'd make them look bad to have someone die during a trial, only to have their reincarnation turned down as well.

Political reasoning is a great way to do things, but sometimes there are other reasons as well. A creature like Fiddlesticks... well, they can't really DO anything with him otherwise. He's too dangerous to be let out to run free, and it's unlikely anyone could truly kill him in any sort of permanent manner. As such, keeping him around as a champion is about the only thing he's good for, and it helps to pay the bills to keep him locked up otherwise.



Additionally, one of the biggest problems in lore in general, is the standard mistake almost every burgeoning writer makes; having characters follow a script.

The problem here, is when a character does something that's out of character, or without any real reason to actually do so. Maybe it's technically in character, but there's no explanation as for why it's in character. The point is, yeu want to make it feel like an actual individual making a decision to join the league, rather than a cardboard cut out following a script without reason for anything they do, other than because it was in the script.

To this end, anything yeu mention in yeur lore, go back and think about whether there's actually enough information provided for any decisions made to make sense. To borrow a recent example from Shia, made by BlackKat101, the lore was very well written, but some issues still existed, one of which being that the character left a comfortable home with only minimal reason to do so, and really desired human contact and friends&family, without much explanation behind why a void creature would think that's something they would want.

In Shia's case, these situations are easily fixed, in that all that would be needed is to provide a brief situation where the champion would be given direct contact with a friend, before they knew whot a friend was, only to have it taken away from her. This gives her reason to want to find another.

The other issue being why she left home; in the original lore, all that's said is she felt guilty, without any real depth or reasoning given. Honestly, it wasn't even her fault, and to stress that, having someone else discover her dark secret and call her out on it, running her out of town, away from her home, would easily fix the problem there, as well. She now has reason to leave.

How BlackKat101 will actually deal with the issues is yet to be seen, and these are only suggestions, but the point is that it's not too hard to tidy up little loose ends such as these.

No matter whot yeu do, make sure there's a reason for why they happen. It can be only briefly hinted at, or maybe even dangled as a mystery in front of the reader, but make sure that yeu specifically note that there is a reason for why they act the way they do, and that it's not just "because it was in the script".

It's one of the hardest things to do in writing, but it will ensure yeur lore is really that much better because of it!



The final major thing to cover, is condensing concepts. The lore in game is fairly limited in length, and yeu have an awful lot of information to cram into that small space! The main way to deal with this, is to be absolutely sure that everything that happens is important. If yeu write something, make sure it furthers the lore somehow. Talking about the history of the champion's sword is kind of pointless, unless that particular history directly affects their choices. Edit out anything that is irrelevant to describing the following:

- The champion's personality
- The champion's abilities
- Why they want to join the league
- Why the league will actually want them in the first place
- The "feel" of the champion's lore (scary, cryptic, epic, heroic, sinister, etc)

If yeu have stuff in yeur lore which doesn't cover something along these lines, then it's probably dead weight and should be removed.

In any case, hopefully these things help yeu out as well!

Thanks Moby for making a post to nudge people in the right direction, as well. Lore can really be whot makes a player get attached to the champion, and want to play them in the first place, even before seeing their abilities. Even if a champion's nerfed into oblivion, people who like the lore will still play them and still buy skins. Don't skimp on the lore!


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Poeta Somnium

Senior Member

12-10-2012

You've been buys while I was away. =)

I'll link this into our main thread.


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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-10-2012

Thanks Katsuni much appreciated
I hope blackkat101 doesn't mind you using them as an example.


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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-10-2012

so busy i didn't even see your post I've been adding stuff. and i creditted you for inspiration since you said if i thought of anything to add it


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blackkat101

Senior Member

12-10-2012

I don't mind at all =^.^=

I am currently working on revisions to my lore for Shia as we speak. Though it may be a bit before I'm willing to update it.

To everyone else, listen and listen well to the wise Katsuni and Moby the White. They know what they're talking about.



- Kat


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Moby the White

Senior Member

12-10-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackkat101 View Post
I don't mind at all =^.^=

I am currently working on revisions to my lore for Shia as we speak. Though it may be a bit before I'm willing to update it.

To everyone else, listen and listen well to the wise Katsuni and Moby the White. They know what they're talking about.



- Kat
cool I will check them out later after writing this lore for Safred. I'll see if there isn't anything I can do to improve it.


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Poeta Somnium

Senior Member

12-10-2012

Some additional input to tack on to the ever-sagacious Katsuni's amaranthine sagaciousness;

Your character should make the reader feel something. Your reader should be able to relate to the character in some way.

One of my favorite examples of this is Skarner; I seriously feel sorry for him. Why? One line did it for me; "I miss my kind." True, some credit is owed to the very talented voice actor, but it is that emotive, personable line of dialogue that forges a link between character and player. Lulu is a great example of the other end of the spectrum; she has cute by the truckload. And notice how the vernacular within the lore is playful; not just what the words are describing, but the words and phrases themselves. The tone of the piece is upbeat to suit the character.

It doesn't have to be a "good" emotion though. While some characters reach us through empathy or likeability or respect, there are other methods available to instill emotion in your reader. Take for example Renekton or Cassiopeia or Singed; they're dark, their nefarious, sick and twisted. We don't "like" or "admire" them, but they fascinate us nontheless. There is something enticing about the macabre if you do it right.

Something to avoid are cases such as Taric or, -- to belabor Katsuni's point, -- Hecarim, where the character fills a trope or archtype but doesn't offer any emotional influence. Both Taric and Hecarim are just "there." We don't know why. They just are. So.... who cares?

Bottom line; your character should leave an impression. Make them memorable. =)


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