Riot is a Business

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Cleril

Senior Member

11-14-2012

I can buy one bowl of Miso soup from Trader Joes for 4 dollars. Include the price of gas to get to the store and so on the soup itself costs me more than ten dollars. I need soup to live and need gas to get the soup. I will need more than one bowl of soup to live and will likely buy more expensive food items as well. Every week my family spends over 300 dollars on groceries alone. Including the 3-4 times of gas acquisition and we can easily spend 500+ dollars just on gas and food.

I can buy a sexy skin for my favorite champion in a free to play game for 10 dollars. Internet is a monthly payment of 89.95 (using Optimum). Cheap routers can go for 50 bucks or so.

500+ dollars spend on living.

149.95 dollars. 10 of those dollars for something I do not need.

Oh, they did nothing to a skin? Oh, this skin doesn't have enough new effects? As a computer graphics major let me fix that attitude for you.

You can jsut click these links and the image loads without you having to download it:

http://www.mediafire.com/view/?a1fen...b5r7sfz4dlj3al - Just the lips themselves took 3 hours. In total the entire piece took 6 hours.

http://www.mediafire.com/view/?a1fen...95qysnoswwa1l9 - Took 1 hour to make just the iris (not the pupil). Took 3 hours to make the entire drawing.

http://www.mediafire.com/view/?a1fen...zp69z2gqass9df - Took about an hour for the whole thing.

http://cleril.deviantart.com/#/d5kgyfe - 40 minutes.

http://cleril.deviantart.com/#/d5ka0ve - About an hour.

And yes I can draw realistically: http://cleril.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d534b3q - Probably 3-4 hours or less.

Art takes time. Now add in the following variables:

A game engine. Animations. UI controlling everything. Effects on enemy champions. Programming.

That is just scratching the surface of video game creation and all of that is involved in a single skin. Riot probably spends more than a week just working on 1 skin. Assuming a 9-5 then a single skin takes 40 hours of work per person working on it.

Minimum wage is about 7.50 or so per hour. Working at a fast food location which does not require any education for 40 hours = 300 dollars.

Riot requires at least high school education last I checked and most Riot employees have been with previous game developers before which absolutely requires college education (25K for tuition for a semester).

And for 40 hours of work their artists have to sell their work for 10 dollars.

How much did Edvard Munch's "The Scream" sell for?

Quote:
A new Guinness World Record has been set for the most expensive painting sold at auction after a version of Edvard Munch's The Scream was yesterday sold for an incredible $119,922,500 US dollars (74 million).
$10 /=/ $119,922,500 US dollars (74 million).

Oh and Munch did several renditions of The Scream. The one that sold was pastels which aren't as "high art" as oil paint. His oil rendition would likely exceed 100 million.

Riot is a business and they're prices are by no means excessive for a piece of their game which is entirely free and a piece of it that you do not need.

I'm not trying to talk down to anyone. I'm simply providing perspective from a 2nd year computer graphics major who has bought 20 dollars worth of content from Riot. I understand the work that does go into these things (I make video games myself) and 10 dollars is not what the actual cost of making that skin is.

And you don't need it, unlike soup, which will cost you 300 bucks a week. And it isn't a one time purchase.

Go complain to food companies if you want to talk about prices.


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Felaedor

Senior Member

11-14-2012

If the commodity were actually limited, or the artists themselves got tangible benefits from their "extra effort", you might have a point.


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Bekkal

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Lots of businesses release products at price points I think are bad, including the one I work for. You should hear the **** I give our marketing team for some of their terrible decisions.

"Being a business" isn't a magic card that lets you charge whatever price you want. Consumers decide market value, period. That's Econ 101.


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Cleril

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Felaedor View Post
If the commodity were actually limited, you might have a point.
I'm making a visual novel and plan to sell it for 5-10 bucks. It's unlimited in quantity because it's digital. It will take me about half a year to fully make the visual novel, 6 months.

But because it is digital, unlimited, and so on I should sell my visual novel for 10 cents?

Time is money.


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Voidgolem

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Felaedor View Post
If the commodity were actually limited, or the artists themselves got tangible benefits from their "extra effort", you might have a point.
being able to charge $10 instead of ~$7, for instance?


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Bekkal

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleril View Post
I'm making a visual novel and plan to sell it for 5-10 bucks. It's unlimited in quantity because it's digital. It will take me about half a year to fully make the visual novel, 6 months.

But because it is digital, unlimited, and so on I should sell my visual novel for 10 cents?

Time is money.
Try again without the hyperbole.


You should sell your product at an amount that will get the most consumers to pay for it while maximizing profit. If you released your first novel at $12 and it sold decently, but you got consistent reviews that it simply wasn't long enough/detailed enough for the price point, you would be wise to release the next novel at $10, because your total profits will surpass the higher price point.

You don't seem to understand business very well.


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Felaedor

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voidgolem View Post
being able to charge $10 instead of ~$7, for instance?
If you can show me where the employees themselves received a bonus (either one time or royalties) for a higher priced skin, I'll stop making the argument.

The company didn't put in more time or effort, because the company itself has no time or effort to put in.

Its employees did.

The people who made the skin aren't getting more for it. They're keeping the jobs they'd have anyway.


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NaPossible

Senior Member

11-14-2012

This has nothing to do with classic iconic art.

This has nothing to do with your art.

This has nothing to do with your income.

This has nothing to do with soup.

(also please be trolling with that art dang)


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Cleril

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bekkal View Post
Try again without the hyperbole.


You should sell your product at an amount that will get the most consumers to pay for it while maximizing profit. If you released your first novel at $12 and it sold decently, but you got consistent reviews that it simply wasn't long enough/detailed enough for the price point, you would be wise to release the next novel at $10, because your total profits will surpass the higher price point.

You don't seem to understand business very well.
Visual novels made from other companies tend to be 10 to 15 bucks.

Selling mine at 5 would certainly be extremely competitive. However my visual novel is also niche, being about porn addiction, and so my demographic is certainly not teenagers (legally speaking, as teens do watch porn anyway). When Riot makes a skin for Lulu they're demographic is solely Lulu players.

13.75% of games have a Lulu in them according to http://lolmatches.com/championstats.

So only that amount of people will even consider buying the skin. The skin also has the goal of making people become Lulu players.

Imagine Riot made an Urgot skin, that's 1% popularity.

You can't possibly argue that you'd sell an Urgot skin at lesser price than other skins just because only 1% of the player population play him.


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Bekkal

Senior Member

11-14-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleril View Post
You can't possibly argue that you'd sell an Urgot skin at lesser price than other skins just because only 1% of the player population play him.

You literally just tried to make the argument that lowering a skin price to attract buyers to a skin for an unpopular champ is a bad idea, but raising a skin price to attract buyers to an unpopular champ is a good idea.

Do you maybe want to rephrase this argument? I am assuming you mistyped somewhere in there.

Edit: I'm glad you used Urgot in your example. Please examine Battlecast Urgot for an example of a similarly-intended skin (attracting new buyers, per your example) can be priced effectively.