The impermanence of death

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steak style

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Senior Member

08-08-2012

As you know, champions are revived upon death in the Fields of Justice.

What sort of effect would this phenomenon have on the lives of champions? Are they desensitized to death? Maybe they become more reckless in real life, subconsciously believing that they will always have a second chance.

What's it like to run a knife into someone's gut and have dinner with them after the match?
What's it like to kill your wife and then be killed by her five minutes later?

Just some stuff to ponder.


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EpicFrogNinja

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Senior Member

08-08-2012

They still wouldn't want to die, even on the Fields of Justice (it could mean horrible pain, as well as losing the match). So I don't think they would be more willing to die in the outside world either.

Wait? There are married champions?


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SilenVt

Senior Member

08-08-2012

Yes, there are married champions (Ashe and Trynamere) but it certainly would be interesting to know about the whole death in the 'innocent' champions such as Annie, Lux, ect.


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TempusVen

Senior Member

08-08-2012

It's a good question. I've wondered far more than is probably healthy about the effect League matches are having on Annie. Killing and being killed on a regular basis, sharing your mind with people much older than you...yikes.

Lux went through a lot before her League days, though, so aside form the...worrying laugh, I'm not too concerned about her.


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Renekton Bot

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Senior Member

08-08-2012

I'm pretty sure that being forced to fight and experience the pain of death thousands of times every day forever would have negative psychological consequences.

Good thing I'm actually a robot beep boop.


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steak style

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Senior Member

08-09-2012

Renekton, what's it like to kill Nasus and then realize he's not actually dead?


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1Eredale

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08-09-2012

Honestly, it's all the same, all the time - only the pain is always different. Everyone is afraid to die; those that do not, are either borderline reckless, or very educated. Just as the saying goes - brave ones are not those without fear, but those who are able to overcome it.

Without doubt, it's hard to say what do beings like Fiddlesticks or Hecarim feel when their presence is eliminated - in my experience, they don't feel daunted at all, for they clearly don't perceive an actual threat. However, human champions are very prone to fear - some more, some less, depending on their beliefs and philosophy. Even as I summoned the most strong-spirited veterans such as Tryndamere or Garen, I've always felt at least a tinge of doubt in them as they come closer to the point that is considered 'death' by the League match regulations. Am I really going to survive this time? What if these foul sorcerers make a mistake and this will be the end?

The more bonds one has to this realm, the harder it is for him to die, even within the League, where the experience of death is distorted and surreal - with the power given by the Nexus, summoners are able to maintain the link between the body and the soul for as long as the League arbiters require. The determination or despair that rises when a Champion is reconnected to their mortal shell, are what fuels their feelings for this realm. You asked, how do siblings and spouses feel while fighting? Their minds are empty, for if they allow at least a tinge of emotion to go through, their strikes would no longer be true. But after the match ends, they always reunite with each other, and their hearts burn ever stronger. It won't be an overestimation to say that the Crownguard siblings have the strongest brotherly bonds, and that the Freljord royal family have become far closer than a political marriage by now. This is the same for opposites as well - Morgana and Kayle's battles are always the most heated, and I don't even speak of Nasus and Renekton who are known to have melted several security measures when they once met at the peaks of their allowed power.

And yes, it takes some feats of disciplines for the Champions to stay restricted out of matches. It is a dreadful feeling, exiting the zone of League's security measures, when that grim realization strikes you - if something were to happen now, it'll be over, permanently. The League champions are more familiar with death than anyone else - and that is what makes them the best.


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Zalmeran

Member

08-09-2012

That is the exact reason why there is a Champion Judgement. To see if a Champion can handle battling on the Fields of Justice. The Summoner dives into the champions mind and uncoveres everything about that Champion, that is the test, pretty much the only reason for the Judgement.


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Arby099

Senior Member

08-09-2012

This question is beneath Xerath


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belthazor3457

Senior Member

08-09-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by steak style View Post
As you know, champions are revived upon death in the Fields of Justice.

What sort of effect would this phenomenon have on the lives of champions? Are they desensitized to death? Maybe they become more reckless in real life, subconsciously believing that they will always have a second chance.

What's it like to run a knife into someone's gut and have dinner with them after the match?
What's it like to kill your wife and then be killed by her five minutes later?

Just some stuff to ponder.
There is no pain mitigation on the field of justice, therefor they will not become any more reckless in real life.

There are cases in lore where league competition got in the way of relationships (eve+TF in the JoJ) and it is a profession that incurs a significant of mental strain. That said, desensitization to violence does not necessarially alter someone's morals (Though it can, it is not guaranteed).

I imagine killing someone and then having dinner wouldn't incur too much bitterness if both parties were mature enough, though you can bet Ashe and Trynd have really really rough make up *** and they might be a little more violent with eachother in their next competing match. That doesn't mean that the competition would be taken off the field too far, though you might notice some... advanced... sexual tastes (whips and chains and such) as a common theme for some champions.

It is a profession like any other profession and any profession has at least limited effects on the person off the job, either for better or for worse. But I can tell you from personal experience, there comes a point when you see enough violence that it becomes desenstizing - but not in a bad way.

Some people get it in a bad way, they become mentally scarred (league judgements exist to stop people who would have this result from becoming champs). Others (more akin to people of the caliber to become league champions) will have a different result. That different result is that it is very easy to transition between the status of "talking to my girlfriend about her emotional issues" and "shooting bank robbers"

in the latter case, it is simply the removal of emotional reaction to violent situations. Selective empathy is the proper term, though those who don't understand it call it "being a sociopath" (which actually isn't a truthful way to label someone).

If you work as a league champion for a few years, you will be very desensitized to violence. That doesn't make you automatically reckless or alter whatever morals you had at the time. It just means you're not going to panic when a bank robbery happens and if one does happen when you are in line and you are thinking about an ice cream cone, once you've shot and killed all the bank robbers, you will still want to go get that ice cream cone, not be traumatized from having to harm someone.

That, and a development of pain tolerance in a manner that doesn't cause the same side effects as actual trauma is helpful, not harmful.

Does that answer all your questions?


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