now that JtF is dead, I am accepting applications for best friend #8

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Surakai

Senior Member

09-27-2014

I would like each applicant to write a 300+ word essay on why you feel you are worthy enough to replace best friend #7 who arguably was the best of all the best friends I have ever had.

coming even remotely close to filling the shoes of this great man is going to be difficult so good luck.


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hex ghost

Senior Member

09-27-2014

Hello, my name is Hex Ghost. I've been on these forums of Off-topic for a while now. My first thread and my 300th thread are nearly the same in quality - saying that, I mean that there is none. I am 24. I like crocodiles too, but not as much as you. I think that fruit is stupid. Honestly, all fruit should grow in hell, to entertain people like you. That being said, I would like to apply for this position. I am not making much money as it is. I would honestly like to do this job, so I can get paid for my holiday time coming up, October 31st through December 28th. I just was in game, and I went "Please RNG gods, give me Blitzcrank!" And began chanting "Blitzcrank" over and over. I ended up getting Blitzcrank, but someone dodged. Weird. Out of 30 champions, they gave me what I wanted after I begged for it. That was my first try, too.

Is that 300 words?


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Jesus thy Lord

Senior Member

09-28-2014

I'm not dead yet, n00b


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KiteAzure

Senior Member

09-28-2014

In the typical sequence of an individual's emotional development, friendships come after parental bonding and before pair bonding. In the intervening period between the end of early childhood and the onset of full adulthood, friendships are often the most important relationships in the emotional life of the adolescent, and are often more intense than relationships later in life.[3] The absence of friends can be emotionally damaging.[4]

The evolutionary psychology approach to human development has led to the theory of Dunbar's number, proposed by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar. He theorized that there is a limit of approximately 150 people with whom a human can maintain stable social relationships.[5]
Childhood
Childhood friends

In childhood, friendships are often based on the sharing of toys, and the enjoyment received from performing activities together. These friendships are maintained through affection, sharing, and creative playtime. While sharing is difficult for children at this age, they are more likely to share with someone they consider to be a friend (Newman & Newman, 2012).[full citation needed] As children mature, they become less individualized and more aware of others. They begin to see their friends' points of view, and enjoy playing in groups. They also experience peer rejection as they move through the middle childhood years. Establishing good friendships at a young age helps a child to be better acclimated in society later on in their life (Newman & Newman, 2012).[full citation needed]. In a 1975 study,[6] Bigelow and La Gaipa found that expectations for a "best friend" become increasingly complex as a child gets older. The study investigated such criteria in a sample of 480 children between the ages of six and fourteen. Their findings highlighted three stages of development in friendship expectations. In the first stage, children emphasized shared activities and the importance of geographical closeness. In the second, they emphasized sharing, loyalty and commitment. In the final stage, they increasingly desired similar attitudes, values and interests. According to Berndt, children prize friendships that are high in prosocial behavior, intimacy, and other positive features; they are troubled by friendships that are high in conflict, dominance, rivalry, and other negative features. High-quality friendships have often been assumed to have positive effects on many aspects of children's social development. Perceived benefits from such friendships include enhanced social success, but they apparently do not include an effect on children's general self-esteem. Numerous studies with adults suggest that friendships and other supportive relationships do enhance self-esteem (Berndt, 2002).[full citation needed] Other potential benefits of friendship include the opportunity to learn about empathy and problem solving.[7] Coaching from parents can be useful in helping children to make friends. Eileen Kennedy-Moore describes three key ingredients of children's friendship formation: (1) openness, (2) similarity, and (3) shared fun.[8][9][10] Parents can also help children understand social guidelines they haven't learned on their own.[11] Drawing from research by Robert Selman[12] and others, Kennedy-Moore outlines developmental stages in children's friendship, reflecting an increasing capacity to understand others' perspectives: "I Want It My Way", "What's In It For Me?", "By the Rules", "Caring and Sharing", and "Friends Through Thick and Thin."[13]


Adolescence
Indian Female friends joyfully sharing Lunch

A study examined over 9,000 American adolescents to determine how their engagement in problem behavior (such as stealing, fighting, truancy) was related to their friendships. Findings indicated that adolescents were less likely to engage in problem behavior when their friends did well in school, participated in school activities, avoided drinking, and had good mental health. The opposite was found regarding adolescents who did engage in more problem behavior. Whether adolescents were influenced by their friends to engage in problem behavior depended on how much they were exposed to those friends, and whether they and their friendship groups "fit in" at school (Crosnoe, R., & Needham, B., 2004).[full citation needed]

A study by researchers from Purdue University found that friendships formed during post-secondary education last longer than friendships formed earlier.[14]
Adulthood
Friendships in adulthood

Life events such as marriage, parenthood, and accelerated career development can complicate friendships in the transition from young adulthood to middle adulthood. After marriage, both women and men report having fewer friends of the opposite *** (Friendships, 2012).[full citation needed]

Adults may find it particularly difficult to maintain meaningful friendships in the workplace. "The workplace can crackle with competition, so people learn to hide vulnerabilities and quirks from colleagues. Work friendships often take on a transactional feel; it is difficult to say where networking ends and real friendship begins."[15] Most adults value the financial security of their jobs more than friendship with coworkers.[16]

The majority of adults have an average of two close friends.[17]
Old age

As family responsibilities and vocational pressures become less, friendships become more important.[18] Among the elderly, friendships can provide links to the larger community; especially for people who cannot go out as often, interactions with friends allow for continued societal interaction. Additionally, older adults in declining health who remain in contact with friends show improved psychological well-being.

Although older adults prefer familiar and established relationships over new ones, friendship formation can continue in old age. With age, elders report that the friends to whom they feel closest are fewer in number and live in the same community. They tend to choose friends whose age, ***, race, ethnicity, and values are like their own. Compared with younger people, fewer older people report other-*** friendships. Older women, in particular, have more secondary friends—people who are not intimates, but with whom they spend time occasionally, such as in groups that meet for lunch or bridge.


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mysticalsoap

Senior Member

09-28-2014

Hello, my name is mysticalsoap. I've been on these forums of Off-topic for a while now. My first thread and my 300th thread are nearly the same in quality - saying that, I mean that there is none. I am 24. I like crocodiles too, but not as much as you. I think that fruit is stupid. Honestly, all fruit should grow in hell, to entertain people like you. That being said, I would like to apply for this position. I am not making much money as it is. I would honestly like to do this job, so I can get paid for my holiday time coming up, October 31st through December 28th. I just was in game, and I went "Please RNG gods, give me Blitzcrank!" And began chanting "Blitzcrank" over and over. I ended up getting Blitzcrank, but someone dodged. Weird. Out of 30 champions, they gave me what I wanted after I begged for it. That was my first try, too.


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Surakai

Senior Member

09-28-2014

ugh, this is going to be harder than I thought.


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Keppa The God

Senior Member

09-29-2014

Hello, my name is Keppa the God. I've been on these forums of Off-topic for way longer than you have. My first thread and my 300th thread are nearly the same in quality - saying that, I mean that there is none. I am between 15 and 20. I like crocodiles too, but not as much as you. I think that fruit is stupid. Honestly, all fruit should grow in hell, to entertain people like you. That being said, I would NOT like to apply for this position. I am not making much money as it is. I would honestly like to do this job, so I can get paid for my holiday time coming up, October 31st through December 28th. I just was in game, and I went "Please RNG gods, give me Blitzcrank!" And began chanting "Blitzcrank" over and over. I ended up getting Blitzcrank, but someone dodged. Weird. Out of 30 champions, they gave me what I wanted after I begged for it. That was my first try, too.

Take me or leave me.


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MarieTheKitten

Senior Member

09-29-2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesus thy Lord View Post
I'm not dead yet, n00b
yet?