Vice Versa?

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Riplius

Junior Member

09-07-2013

I keep hearing this "vice versa" What does it mean?


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Damned Scholar

Senior Member

09-07-2013

It's Latin. It means (roughly) "the other way around".

Veni, vidi, vici, et vice versa.

Nota bene: The 'c' in Latin is a hard 'c', so it sounds like 'k'. Don't be fooled by the anglicized pronunciation of "Caesar".


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JungHai0

Senior Member

09-07-2013

In example, "To make a bowl of cereal, you can pour the cereal then the milk, or vice versa."

To make a bowl of cereal, you can pour the cereal then the milk, or the milk then the cereal.


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Riplius

Junior Member

09-14-2013

Ohhh thank you.


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Dances

Senior Member

09-14-2013

That's actually latin?thanks for expanding my education always knew what it meant but latin?nice


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Chaos Open

Senior Member

09-14-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dances View Post
That's actually latin?thanks for expanding my education always knew what it meant but latin?nice
You probably use a lot of Latin phrases in your everyday life. For example "etc" is fully written "et cetera" and means "and all other things."
Other phrases you might use: "Bona Fide," "Per se," "Alter ego," and "status quo;" all are Latin.


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Damned Scholar

Senior Member

09-15-2013

A pet peeve of mine: the abbreviation "vs" or "v" means "versus", but people unfamiliar with the Latin (or who have just never seen it written out) think that it's "verses", and think that "I'll verse you" means something other than "I will help you study" or "I will immortalize you in poetry".

Semper ubi sub ubi.