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MASSIVE Leagues bug EXTREME GLITCH

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sirturkey1

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Samuel Lee:
darius's wizards???


Yeah that's the part I have a problem with. Of all the dudes to call a wizard it's the man with a massive ax who doesn't do anything magic.....


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Cobalt Crush

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
WhattayaBrian:
Singular possessive adds an apostrophe s, regardless of the letter the word ends in, barring exceptions like "its".

While it's true that it can be acceptable to do the alternative depending on where you go, the fewer silly rules we have in grammar, the better.


NO I will not except this response! Fix it! GRAMMAR NAZI'S UNITE!!!!!!


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Oux

Member

02-05-2013

*Shrugs* If you are talking pure communication a linguist will tell you the rules of grammar extend only as far as being understood. However; if you are talking about a technicality of writing as a form, either technical or artistic, the rules are laid down and very clear. 95% of people probably don't ever need to know the rules because they don't write or perform in that arena, but, if you call out someone that is working in that arena, you need to be correct in your assertion.

The vernacular can change rapidly, but the rules that govern grammar in writing change much, much slower. You are talking hundreds of years. It is why you can still read Moby-Dick and understand it.


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Vsin

Senior Member

02-05-2013

While we're having this argument, can we please get Singular They to be academically accepted? Blanket "He" and "He/She" bug the **** out of me.


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Eninya

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
WhattayaBrian:
Singular possessive adds an apostrophe s, regardless of the letter the word ends in, barring exceptions like "its".

While it's true that it can be acceptable to do the alternative depending on where you go, the fewer silly rules we have in grammar, the better.

Thank you for understanding possessiveness in grammar for this. I cringed at how many upvotes the OP got.


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WarlordAlpha

Recruiter

02-05-2013

Quote:
Eninya:
I cringed at how many upvotes the OP got.


Eh, with 4000 views I know for a fact this thread has its fair share of downvotes too.


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WarlordAlpha

Recruiter

02-05-2013

Quote:
Oux:
The vernacular can change rapidly, but the rules that govern grammar in writing change much, much slower. You are talking hundreds of years. It is why you can still read Moby-Dick and understand it.


That's a good distinction to make. Words changing =/= mechanics changing


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Nasdrovia499

Senior Member

02-05-2013

That's typically the kind of obnoxious rule which origin was long forgotten, and now both ways are acceptable. Foreign schools teaching english usually teach that singular and proper nouns ending with an "s" simply take an apostrophe (Darius' Wizards). Many historical references also take an s (Darius's Wizards). Really, just pick one of them.

Btw, St James's : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James%27s


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Oux

Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Vsin:
While we're having this argument, can we please get Singular They to be academically accepted? Blanket "He" and "He/She" bug the **** out of me.

It is 100% acceptable and has been since way back. The romantics and most of Victorian era writers used 'they' as a gender neutral singular pronoun. Only recent convention has tried to shift the usage of 'they' to a purely plural usage and replace it with what is now though of as PC he/she. Go wild with it, no English academic in the world will nay say that usage.


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Nasdrovia499

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Cobalt Crush:
NO I will not except this response! Fix it! GRAMMAR NAZI'S UNITE!!!!!!


Hmmm.