Does 0.9999(repeating) = 1?

Yes 705 54.95%
No 578 45.05%
Voters: 1283. You may not vote on this poll

Does 0.9999(repeating) = 1?

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Magni

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Senior Member

01-23-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryster View Post
5 * infinity does equal 20 * infinity... but the 20 * infinity is a BIGGER infinity... if you can comprehend that. ;p
Edit: I changed it to * just so it is easier to comprehend, works the same with division.
5 * infinity = infinity
20 * infinity = infinity

Neither is "bigger" or "smaller" than the other.


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Emperor Z19

Senior Member

01-23-2013

People reject the notion on the basis of their intuition, but intuition is of no help here, because nothing in the physical universe reflects infinity. It's a matter of math, limits.


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fmwyso

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Recruiter

01-23-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Statiqhock View Post
It doesn't, because it's not written 1. It's "1-dx", "the smallest possible value less than one", so close to 1 that it's the same even within our mathematical definition, but it's just a bit less.
Why would it be dx? There is no dx whatsoever Statiqhock...

x = .999...

10x = 9.999...

10x = 9 + x

9x = 9

x = 1

Does that help you understand? It is definitively 1, stop trying to act like you can conceptually misconstrue definitions; we simply don't need to in this case.


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Magni

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Senior Member

01-23-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinkywheel View Post
Here's the thing: There's a difference between theoretical mathematics and actually applying it to the real world.

.999 repeating is so close to 1 that it may as well be 1, but there's no real world example where something is that incredibly close to 1. Looking down to the atoms, there can only be whole number atoms, right?
Another person joins the "0.999... is a finite number" club.


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Eviscerates

Senior Member

01-23-2013

my brain hurts always hated math


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CupcakeRaptorr

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Member

01-23-2013

the easiest interpretation is 1/3 = .333 repeating

3/3=1 =.999 repeating


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Moosenocalypse

Senior Member

01-23-2013

Why are Reds commenting on this while it's still in GD yet has NOTHING to do with League?


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ArmySquirrel

Senior Member

01-23-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiotDerivative View Post
That's fine. I am human. I am allowed to be incorrect.
You should talk to Damiya about getting that fixed.


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Imogen Poots

Senior Member

01-23-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinkywheel View Post
Here's the thing: There's a difference between theoretical mathematics and actually applying it to the real world.

.999 repeating is so close to 1 that it may as well be 1, but there's no real world example where something is that incredibly close to 1. Looking down to the atoms, there can only be whole number atoms, right?
That's the key to people's mental block on this: Incredibly close to 1 is not the same thing as infinitely close to 1. What do you think the mathematical definition of infinitely close to 1 is in calculus? Yeah. Get it yet?

It's like playing chess and arguing over how horses don't move like knights in real life.


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khila

Senior Member

01-23-2013

Yes because screw prime numbers... (sorry i just despise there non-evenly devidedness with a passion...)