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Explain to me why was i banned

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ApeGut

Junior Member

01-08-2013

You aren't allowed to type in LoL anymore, the reports are way out of control. In fact you'll still get reported even if you do nothing wrong just b/c you did poorly or took someone's role/hero. Reporting is broken, has been for a while, honestly find a new game they don't deserve your time and money.


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Ext3rmin8or2

Senior Member

01-08-2013

Quote:
SwiftyNyce:


4-- dude kept going afk and running in to die when he came back you were not in the game so the harassment bull**** isnt needed since he was wasting 9 other players time..


It doesn't matter what the other players were doing.

Quote:
SwiftyNyce:
These rules didnt mean **** bc i didnt cus anyone out which still mean i can say what ever i want ... i can say **** ***** **** **** *******... welcome to life where people can say anything they want.


Welcome to League of Legends, where you can say whatever you want, including "**** ***** **** **** *******... " as long as you are willing to accept the consequences. (gettting banned)

Quote:
SwiftyNyce:
Who the hell are you for me to care what my attitude should or should not be? What i have to act a certain way to? And how should my attitude be after being banned over nothing?


I wouldn't know, as you definitely weren't banned for nothing. You have proven that time and time again within this thread alone.


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Ext3rmin8or2

Senior Member

01-08-2013

A waffle is a batter-based or dough-based cake cooked in a waffle iron patterned to give a characteristic size, shape and surface impression. There are many variations based on the type of iron and recipe used, with over a dozen regional varieties in Belgium alone.

Waffles are eaten throughout the world, particularly in Belgium, France, Netherlands, Scandinavia, and the United States.

The word “waffle” first appears in the English language in 1725: "Waffles. Take flower, cream..." It is directly derived from the Dutch ‘’wafel’’, which itself derives from the Middle Dutch ‘’wafele’’.

While the Middle Dutch ‘’wafele’’ is first attested to at the end of the 13th century, it is preceded by the French ‘’walfre’’ in 1185; both are considered to share the same Frankish etymological root ‘’wafla’’. Depending on the context of the use of ‘’wafla’’, it either means honeycomb or cake.

Alternate spellings throughout contemporary and medieval Europe include wafre, wafer, wâfel, waufre, gaufre, goffre, gauffre, wafe, waffel, wåfe, wāfel, wafe, vaffel, and våffla.

Waffles are preceded, in the early Middle Ages, around the period of the 9th-10th centuries, with the simultaneous emergence of fer à hosties / hostieijzers (communion wafer irons) and moule à oublies (wafer irons). While the communion wafer irons typically depicted imagery of Jesus and his crucifixion, the moule à oublies featured more trivial Biblical scenes or simple, emblematic designs. The format of the iron itself was almost always round and considerably larger than those used for communion.

The oublie was, in its basic form, composed only of grain flour and water – just as was the communion wafer. It took until the 11th century, as a product of The Crusades bringing new culinary ingredients to Western Europe, for flavorings such as orange blossom water to be added to the oublies; however, locally-sourced honey and other flavorings may have already been in use before that time.

Oublies, not formally named as such until ca. 1200, spread throughout northwestern continental Europe, eventually leading to the formation of the oublieurs guild in 1270. These oublieurs/obloyers were responsible for not only producing the oublies but also for a number of other contemporaneous and subsequent pâtisseries légères (light pastries), including the waffles that were soon to arise.

Waffles remained widely popular in Europe for the first half of the 19th century, despite the 1806 British Atlantic naval blockade that greatly inflated the price of sugar. This coincided with the commercial production of beet sugar in continental Europe, which, in a matter of decades, had brought the price down to historical lows. Within the transitional period from cane to beet sugar, Florian Dacher invented the Brussels Waffle (Brusselse Wafel), the predecessor to American “Belgian” waffles, recording the recipe in 1842/43. Stroopwafels (Dutch syrup wafels), too, rose to prominence in Holland by the middle of the century. However, by the second half of the 1800s, inexpensive beet sugar became widely available, and a wide range of pastries, candies and chocolates were now accessible to the middle class, as never before; waffles’ popularity declined rapidly.

By the early 20th century, waffle recipes become rare in recipe books, and only 29 professional waffle craftsmen, the oublieurs, remained in Paris. Waffles were shifting from a predominately street-vendor-based product to an increasingly homemade product, aided by the 1918 introduction of GE’s first electric commercial waffle maker. By the mid-1930s, dry pancake/waffle mix had been marketed by a number of companies, including Aunt Jemima, Bisquick, and a team of three brothers from San Jose, Calif. – the Dorsas. It is the Dorsas who would go on to innovate commercial production of frozen waffles, which they began selling under the name “Eggo” in 1953.

Then in 1958, a Belgian restauranteur, Maurice Vermersch, showcased his version of the Brussels waffle at Expo 58 in Brussels. Following his success there, he made plans to introduce them to America, but was beat to the U.S. by another salesman who sold his own Gaufres de Bruxelles with modest success at the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. It was in 1964, however, when Maurice Vermersch finally debuted his “Bel-Gem” waffles at the 1964 New York World’s Fair that they took hold in the States. Originally intended as a marketing device, to work around Americans’ poor recognition of Brussels geographically, the “Bel-Gem” name stuck and quickly morphed into the distinctly American concept of the “Belgian waffle”. In practice, contemporary American “Belgian waffles” are actually a hybrid of pre-existing American waffle types and ingredients, together with some physical attributes of both Vermersch’s and true Brussels waffles.

In the 21st century, waffles continue to evolve. What began as flour and water heated between two iron plates are now popular the world over, produced in sweet and savory varieties, in myriad shapes and sizes. Even as most of the original recipes have faded from use, a number of the 18th and 19th century varieties can still be easily found throughout Northern Europe, where they were first developed.


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Yujiza

Senior Member

01-08-2013

He has to be trolling, otherwise a sociopath (serious problem).


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SwiftyNyce

Member

01-08-2013

Quote:
Ext3rmin8or2:
It doesn't matter what the other players were doing.



Welcome to League of Legends, where you can say whatever you want, including "**** ***** **** **** *******... " as long as you are willing to accept the consequences. (gettting banned)



I wouldn't know, as you definitely weren't banned for nothing. You have proven that time and time again within this thread alone.



You are just restarting a argument that has alrdy passed you are mad late ...


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SwiftyNyce

Member

01-08-2013

Dam i come back from practice to all this very very nice


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Ext3rmin8or2

Senior Member

01-09-2013

Quote:
SwiftyNyce:
You are just restarting a argument that has alrdy passed you are mad late ...


The argument others have already used to explain to you why you got banned? Yeah. The title of your thread is "Explain to me why was I banned". It has been explained.


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BloodyConage

Member

01-09-2013

Quote:
SwiftyNyce:
http://na.leagueoflegends.com/tribunal/en/case/6113713/#nogo

Punish number 1----I complained about a very bad amumu and i barely said anything ban worthy. In fact im allowed to say what ever the hell i want but i still didnt say anything bad when even other people where complaining about amumu.



In what world does the person getting banned get to determine what is "banworthy", or whether or not they should be banned?


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SwiftyNyce

Member

01-09-2013

Quote:
Ext3rmin8or2:
The argument others have already used to explain to you why you got banned? Yeah. The title of your thread is "Explain to me why was I banned". It has been explained.


Well no **** sherlock just restate what i said and feel cool


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SwiftyNyce

Member

01-09-2013

Quote:
BloodyConage:
In what world does the person getting banned get to determine what is "banworthy", or whether or not they should be banned?


In a world where a gaming community has a bad banning system.