viruses

Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

firefox234

Senior Member

12-28-2012

like not computer ones but like how the hell arent they alive that would be like a rock just randomly attacking things where do they even come from am i suppose to beileve bits of protien or whatever there made of just randomly attack cells dunk it and then die but at the same time make another virus why is it doing that lol its not even alive viruses dont even react if nothing alive is around they just lay dormant science is bs just like riot saying the isp promblem is everyones elses not there own


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

TheTuanster

Senior Member

12-28-2012

A virus is a small infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants to bacteria and archaea.[1]

Since Dmitri Ivanovsky's 1892 article describing a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants, and the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898,[2] about 5,000 viruses have been described in detail,[3] although there are millions of different types.[4] Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most abundant type of biological entity.[5][6] The study of viruses is known as virology, a sub-speciality of microbiology.

Virus particles (known as virions) consist of two or three parts: i) the genetic material made from either DNA or RNA, long molecules that carry genetic information; ii) a protein coat that protects these genes; and in some cases iii) an envelope of lipids that surrounds the protein coat when they are outside a cell. The shapes of viruses range from simple helical and icosahedral forms to more complex structures. The average virus is about one one-hundredth the size of the average bacterium. Most viruses are too small to be seen directly with an optical microscope.

The origins of viruses in the evolutionary history of life are unclear: some may have evolved from plasmids – pieces of DNA that can move between cells – while others may have evolved from bacteria. In evolution, viruses are an important means of horizontal gene transfer, which increases genetic diversity.[7]

Viruses spread in many ways; viruses in plants are often transmitted from plant to plant by insects that feed on plant sap, such as aphids; viruses in animals can be carried by blood-sucking insects. These disease-bearing organisms are known as vectors. Influenza viruses are spread by coughing and sneezing. Norovirus and rotavirus, common causes of viral gastroenteritis, are transmitted by the faecal–oral route and are passed from person to person by contact, entering the body in food or water. HIV is one of several viruses transmitted through sexual contact and by exposure to infected blood. The range of host cells that a virus can infect is called its "host range". This can be narrow or, as when a virus is capable of infecting many species, broad.[8]

Viral infections in animals provoke an immune response that usually eliminates the infecting virus. Immune responses can also be produced by vaccines, which confer an artificially acquired immunity to the specific viral infection. However, some viruses including those that cause AIDS and viral hepatitis evade these immune responses and result in chronic infections. Antibiotics have no effect on viruses, but several antiviral drugs have been developed.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

firefox234

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTuanster View Post
A virus is a small infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants to bacteria and archaea.[1]

Since Dmitri Ivanovsky's 1892 article describing a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants, and the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898,[2] about 5,000 viruses have been described in detail,[3] although there are millions of different types.[4] Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most abundant type of biological entity.[5][6] The study of viruses is known as virology, a sub-speciality of microbiology.

Virus particles (known as virions) consist of two or three parts: i) the genetic material made from either DNA or RNA, long molecules that carry genetic information; ii) a protein coat that protects these genes; and in some cases iii) an envelope of lipids that surrounds the protein coat when they are outside a cell. The shapes of viruses range from simple helical and icosahedral forms to more complex structures. The average virus is about one one-hundredth the size of the average bacterium. Most viruses are too small to be seen directly with an optical microscope.

The origins of viruses in the evolutionary history of life are unclear: some may have evolved from plasmids – pieces of DNA that can move between cells – while others may have evolved from bacteria. In evolution, viruses are an important means of horizontal gene transfer, which increases genetic diversity.[7]

Viruses spread in many ways; viruses in plants are often transmitted from plant to plant by insects that feed on plant sap, such as aphids; viruses in animals can be carried by blood-sucking insects. These disease-bearing organisms are known as vectors. Influenza viruses are spread by coughing and sneezing. Norovirus and rotavirus, common causes of viral gastroenteritis, are transmitted by the faecal–oral route and are passed from person to person by contact, entering the body in food or water. HIV is one of several viruses transmitted through sexual contact and by exposure to infected blood. The range of host cells that a virus can infect is called its "host range". This can be narrow or, as when a virus is capable of infecting many species, broad.[8]

Viral infections in animals provoke an immune response that usually eliminates the infecting virus. Immune responses can also be produced by vaccines, which confer an artificially acquired immunity to the specific viral infection. However, some viruses including those that cause AIDS and viral hepatitis evade these immune responses and result in chronic infections. Antibiotics have no effect on viruses, but several antiviral drugs have been developed.
doesnt answer why. how can viruses even exist why do they attack cells why do they move where the hell are they from.how can they not be alive is something else like programming them are they just like little robots if not they have to be alive


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Ozbirta

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by firefox234 View Post
doesnt answer why. how can viruses even exist why do they attack cells why do they move where the hell are they from.how can they not be alive is something else like programming them are they just like little robots if not they have to be alive
hmm, weed for breakfast this morning?


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Finn the Human

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Take biology when you reach high school if it interests you that much...


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Winderz

Member

12-28-2012

Viruses have DNA that tells them how to survive and reproduce just like every living species.

They just don't take in energy from the environment and they cannot live/reproduce without a host.

So they are like living organisms, but our detailed list of what you need to be considered "living" excludes them.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

firefox234

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn the Human View Post
Take biology when you reach high school if it interests you that much...
if the internet cant even explain it why bother taking biology i understand what viruses do but i dont understand why they do it if there not alive cause that doesnt make any sense


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Galdivar

Recruiter

12-28-2012

the answer to the question "why" viruses do what they do is simple, they do it because they can, they exist because it it possible for them to exist.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Keshaldra

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by firefox234 View Post
doesnt answer why.
Yes, it does. Read it again.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

firefox234

Senior Member

12-28-2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keshaldra View Post
Yes, it does. Read it again.
dude it doesnt