Need help analyzing please.

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Magna

Junior Member

10-05-2012

I need help improving at this game. Currently I am at 1300 elo, I have been in the 1200-1300 range for a couple months and feel like I am not improving as best as I could be. A lot of people say to watch your replays to improve your play but when I do watch them it feels like I am just watching the game as a spectator and not learning anything. I have a decent knowledge of the game but am still having trouble. I also play Starcraft 2 and I feel that it is much easier to notice your mistakes and improve your play by watching your replays. Is it because I don't have enough knowledge of the game or is it something else?

tl;dr - Need help figuring out what to watch when analyzing replays.


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ArtDZ

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Senior Member

10-05-2012

Well for starters are you winning your lane consistently? If your a jungler are your ganks working often?

Once you kinda have those down. If your mid you can gank bot/top. Take enemy wraiths. Ward the enemy jungle. Invade the enemy jungle etc.. If your top you can push the creep wave and with a couple of wards start taking the enemy blue or killing them when they try to take it. Can also secure dragon etc..

TLDR once your good enough to win your lane every time at that elo try to help out your allies as much as possible, choke enemy jungle gold/buffs, and get global objectives.

If you don't have many games play more. I just started ranked this season recently and had awful luck (9 4v5's in first 30 games). Now that all my allies are not mysteriously gone during the loading screen i've gotten like 130elo last two days.


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YerroFever

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Senior Member

10-05-2012

There are two things you have to watch for.

1) Why did you die?
- Did you blow your CC on the enemy while you eren't being ganked? If so, don't do it again and save your CC for when you do get ganked.
- Are you spamming your abilities and going OOM and can't defend yourself when they come at you? If so, focus on last hitting and avoiding enemy damage. Being a passive laner is nothing to be ashamed of. Remember, 15 CS = 1 kill (except first blood). If you're 15 CS ahead of the enemy and you both are at 0/0/0, you're winning.
- Are you pushed up to the enemy tower? If so, you need wards so you don't get ganked. Even if it's just one ward. If you push up to the enemy tower, ward one side, and be closer to that side of the lane so that if you see the enemy junlger, you can quickly rush back, or if they gank from the other side, you have easy escape.
- Not sure why you died? Look your enemy champ up. Read their skills. Play as them in a bot game. Understand their mechanics. Look up their strengths and weaknesses. Then figure out how your main's strengths can overcome your weakness against that enemy. This can be done by a change of strategy, or a change in your skill order, or change in your item build. Rigid play styles are the easiest to counter. You have to be flexible and adapt to the situations.
2) Why did you lose your lane?
- Is it failed map awareness? This just comes with practice. Read chat or come up with a system and tell your allies what it is. I generally like double warn ping to let my allies know my lane is missing and I usually type out "ss" since it's faster than "mia." Some people respond better to pings, some better in chat. I try to do both but sometimes it's hard to do both and still get CS and not die. Also, make sure you know where your jungler is and what is in your field of vision/ward's vision. Helping your jungler not get counter jungled is SO important. Just glance at the minimap every few seconds. You don't have to stare at it all the time. You'll lose if you are constantly staring at it, but you'll lose if you never look at it. It's a happy medium.
- Are you letting your mid roam? If they're leaving the lane and ganking other lanes, follow them or push to the enemy tower so they have to stay in the lane.
- Did you die too much? If so... look above.


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Valrcrist

Senior Member

10-05-2012

Winning your lane is important, but in my experience both playing and spectating friends' games, it's not the most important factor in whether you win or lose a game.

The biggest factor I've seen is throwing the game. Most people in the elo range that you're in don't know what to do with the lead they have, unless the game is just SUCH a stompfest that they can roll right through the other team. This leads to people doing stupid things and getting caught out, which makes it REALLY easy for the game to turn around.

For example, yesterday, I was spectating a friend's game, and watched them almost lose a game in which they were up by 10k gold by the 30 minute mark. Instead of grouping up and pushing objectives, everyone split up to do their own thing, which lead to 2 people getting caught and killed, and the other team being able to baron and getting another kill or two when the 3 remaining people tried to contest it. With baron buff (which is worth a HUGE amount of gold statswise, in addition to the 300g per person from killing baron), the other team was able to push straight down middle and take 2 towers + inhib. My friend did end up winning, but the game went 20 minutes longer than it should have, and the other team did come really close to making a comeback.

The point I'm getting at with this, is that one of the major things you should do, even more important than reviewing the laning phase imo, is look at what happens in teamfights. See how games are won or lost AFTER the laning phase happens. Even if you're behind when laning ends, look for points where making the right call could have turned the game around. See if your team has good vision of the map, or if you need to work on getting more wards out and keeping vision up. Sometimes you have to make tradeoffs, and recognizing when that's the case is very very important. I'll give another example.

I watched a game where the purple team was winning and decided to do Baron at 25 mins or so while four members of the blue team were around bot lane. Purple's first bot lane turret was down, blue team's creep wave was pushing, and the blue team recognized that there was really no way they could get to Baron in time to contest it, particularly since purple was already ahead. Instead of TRYING to contest it, which could easily have ended up with blue getting to Baron right as purple killed it, and then turned on them with Baron buff and got an ace, which would have ended the game, the four members of blue team that were bot just pushed bot lane, and managed to push ALL the way up, and took purple's bot inhibitor. This ended up with blue getting more global gold than purple did, taking more overall global objectives, and putting purple on the defensive, which meant that purple couldn't even get use out of the Baron buff. Blue ended up turning the game around after that point, and won the game.


Obviously these are just examples, and you may never be faced with these scenarios, but the point is to look for these sorts of decision points. Communicating with your team and making calls/being a leader often is much more important to winning the game than just having a good laning phase.