An Expert's Guide to 'Noobs'

Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Lvl 8 Psyduck

This user has referred a friend to League of Legends, click for more information

Senior Member

05-24-2011

its like when i was playing xin and i bought thornmail

someone called me a noob and said its not worthy for me and the problem he didnt get any thornmail and he played morde

and the other team got some really feeded AD carries and thats why i bought it and he just didnt understand it then in the end we lost and he had like 3/12/? and then he blamed me for it lol

while i got 6/8/?

some ppl just dont change


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Tactical Magic

This user has referred a friend to League of Legends, click for more information

Senior Member

05-24-2011

I have some advice, but I completely agree with this guide. I was thinking about writing something similar myself until I saw this.

I have two suggestions: create an introductory summary (of a few sentences), and frame advice-giving as being in would-be ragers' self-interest. First, I suspect that many would-be ragers that need to read this guide are cynical people with short attention spans. I'm betting that many of the people that start raging at the 10:00 mark don't read past the introductory paragraph. As a result, it might help to make a "bottom line" early on in the guide that sums up your thesis in a few sentences.

Also, again, I think you need to frame your thesis as being in would-be ragers self-interest (and I'll explain why below). As for actual wording I suggest the following:

"Raging never helps, but advice sometimes does. If you give advice, the team might be able to turn around and win THIS game."

I talk with ragers a lot (perhaps because I'm a glutton for punishment), and I consistently use this approach. Believe it or not, this sometimes works.

I'll explain: in economics, a basic fundamental is negative versus positive externalities. When you do something good that affects other people as well, that creates positive externalities, and negative is vice versa. Almost without fail, actions that create positive externalities (in this case helping out "noobs") don't get done enough. [Side note: that's why the government has to subsidize activities that create positive externalities, like building roads and schools, to make sure they get done.]

However, while helping "noobs" does create positive externalities (it helps the noobs themselves and the community at large, which you point out), helping noobs is also in the would-be ragers self-interest. It's in their self-interest because sometimes a few pieces of carefully worded advice can turn around a game, and help the would-be ragers to get a win. This distinction between creating a "positive externality" and doing something in one's own self interest is an important one. Again, in economics, actions that are in our own self-interests traditionally do get "done enough", and don't have to be subsidized. While some people will create positive externalities just because it's "the right thing to do," unfortunately, I suspect that most ragers are rarely these people.

In other words, in order to get most would-be ragers to do anything, you have to frame advice as something that's in their own self-interest. The problem is that framing advice as "helping noobs in the long run" or "improves the community" doesn't make advice look like it's in ragers' self-interest. Instead, you have to communicate to them that giving advice might help them (the would-be ragers) directly. How? By communicating that advice could potentially help turn the game around for a win.

I haven't read all the comments, so I'm not sure if I'm repeating anyone. Also, I realize that most LoL discussions don't use economics and psychology, so everything may not have made sense. Please let me know if that's the case!


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

SiriusDog

Junior Member

06-23-2011

I know this is an older thread, but I have to say, thank you sooooo much for making this.
There have been many games where I was (excuse the language) *****ed at and called a noob ad nauseum.

It made me feel worthless and my strategic thinking was suffering because of it. Heck, I accidentally screwed up my hard drive because I raged and smacked my laptop. LOL After that incident, I'm getting better at handling it but again, thanks a lot for making this.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

LengendaryGhost

Member

06-23-2011

Be "nub-friendly" guys! xD


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Sënuch

Senior Member

03-01-2013

Resurrection


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

GonefishingX

Senior Member

03-02-2013

Thank you for mentioning that kids prolly play this game, I always try to keep my cursing to a minimum. Funnily enough people taunt me for not cussing and call me a kid..... logic?

It doesn't require a saint to be a friendly player just some discipline.


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

BudgetNinja

Senior Member

04-13-2013

Check out my Diamond 1 Kennen Guide:http://www.lolking.net/guides/49568-----Here's your Bump

~Budgetninja


Comment below rating threshold, click here to show it.

Armageddal

Senior Member

04-14-2013

I'm interested to know what your opinion is on the meta-game and strange builds.

I often use strange builds that I have come up with as a means to enjoy the game more, but I get harassed because of it. I understand that it can sometimes be a "detriment" to one's team, but I never use a build that is completely useless (since it's not fun anyways). In fact, if you look at it from a certain perspective, it's no different than playing the way champions were "meant to be played." Hypothetically, if Caitlyn is better than Ezreal as an AD carry by '5 points' and AP Orianna is better than AD Orianna by '5 points', then there really isn't any difference between playing champions with their intended builds and with your own build. Point being, some champions are always going to be "better" than others, both at the level of intended play-style, and at the level of unintended play-style.