MASSIVE Leagues bug EXTREME GLITCH

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WarlordAlpha

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Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oux View Post
It is 100% acceptable and has been since way back. The romantics and most of Victorian era writers used 'they' as a gender neutral singular pronoun. Only recent convention has tried to shift the usage of 'they' to a purely plural usage and replace it with what is now though of as PC he/she. Go wild with it, no English academic in the world will nay say that usage.
Okay, i love you now. I HATE it when people try to tell me that I can't use "they" as a singular gender-neutral pronoun. If it didn't sound right I could maybe agree with them, but it even sounds good.


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Oux

Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nasdrovia499 View Post
That's typically the kind of obnoxious rule which origin was long forgotten, and now both ways are acceptable. Foreign schools teaching english usually teach that singular and proper nouns ending with an "s" simply take an apostrophe (Darius' Wizards). Many historical references also take an s (Darius's Wizards). Really, just pick one of them.

Btw, St James's : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James's
Incorrect, Sir. They literally mean different things. You can't just pick one, you have to pick the right one. And foreign schools can teach whatever they like, I am pretty sure not all my Latin grammar was taught spot on but being taught something wrong doesn't make it correct.

Reminds me of Kung Pow "Try my face to your foot style! Ha! I am bleeding making me the victor!"

"We taught him wrong, as a joke."


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Nasdrovia499

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oux View Post
Incorrect, Sir. They literally mean different things. You can't just pick one, you have to pick the right one. And foreign schools can teach whatever they like, I am pretty sure not all my Latin grammar was taught spot on but being taught something wrong doesn't make it correct.

Reminds me of Kung Pow "Try my face to your foot style! Ha! I am bleeding making me the victor!"

"We taught him wrong, as a joke."
Foreign schools usually have english teachers from America or English speaking countries though, I would assume some of them know their stuff.

Care to elaborate on the first part ?


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Diamonesd

Senior Member

02-05-2013

both Darius' and Darius's are acceptable. So go back to school buddy


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Silverkillz

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02-05-2013

Its grammatically correct actually. Shows how much you payed attention.

You are suggesting "Darius' Wizards" or "Varus' Horde", but that would mean that Darius and Varus were plural, not singular, and therefore more than one Darius or Varus. Example: Travis's Room, Not Travis' Room, which means that there is more than one Travis. =) the more you know


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Oux

Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nasdrovia499 View Post
Foreign schools usually have english teachers from America or English speaking countries though, I would assume some of them know their stuff.

Care to elaborate on the first part ?
I did earlier.

Darius' is plural meaning 2 or more Darius (If Darius was a last name it could be John Darius and Martha Darius) own something.

Darius's is singular meaning Darius owns something.

Both ARE correct IF (and I can't stress this enough) they are used in the proper situation. Since there is only one (thank god) Darius it has to be Darius's. Darius' makes zero sense.

Saying you can use either is lazy at worst, and ignorant at best.


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Rivini

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobalt Crush View Post
NO I will not except this response! Fix it! GRAMMAR NAZI'S UNITE!!!!!!
Quote:
No, I will not accept this response! Fix it! GRAMMAR NAZIS, UNITE!!!!!!
That's better.


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F r

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Purdue OWL View Post
add 's to the singular form of the word (even if it ends in -s):
the owner's car
James's hat (James' hat is also acceptable. For plural, proper nouns that are possessive, use an apostrophe after the 's': "The Eggleses' presentation was good." The Eggleses are a husband and wife consultant team.)
source: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/621/01/

Your usage of grammar is terrible.


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Shaidster

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Darius' Wizards or Darius's Wizards are both correct versions. I personally write the former every time.


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Nasdrovia499

Senior Member

02-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oux View Post
I did earlier.

Darius' is plural meaning 2 or more Darius (If Darius was a last name it could be John Darius and Martha Darius) own something.

Darius's is singular meaning Darius owns something.

Both ARE correct IF (and I can't stress this enough) they are used in the proper situation. Since there is only one (thank god) Darius it has to be Darius's. Darius' makes zero sense.

Saying you can use either is lazy at worst, and ignorant at best.
I'm not sure about your priority order. Laziness would be the best case scenario - it led to thousands of improvements. Ignorance has always been a plague.

Anyway, on topic :

So St James's Palace is correct while St James' Palace isn't.
Yet, you say Aristophanes' plays, and as far as I know Aristophanes is singular too.

People are "lazy" to define very specific rules (do it if singular / with an S / proper noun / BUT not for classic names...etc.) simply because there's no need for it.
From the context, it should be fairly obvious that the noun is singular (or plural). The last S is just a matter of style.