Struggling to Find Opportunities in eSports

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A Real Hero

Junior Member

09-04-2013

So here I am in my senior year of college getting a degree where I can easily earn a more than sustainable income upon graduating. But not in the career path I want to be in and not where my passion lies.

I want to be involved in eSports and I am struggling to find opportunities. I'm trying to develop my resume to show how I'm qualified, but the opportunities to show evidence of my passion are unattainable. The most I have going for me is I helped found a student organization at my university and I manage my universities collegiate(premier) teams, I have a coaching program that successfully teaches students, and I'm reaching out to establish a network between nearby Universities.

My school is in the Midwest, east of STL. I'm near Riot headquarter, their programming division. I'm actually getting my degree in CMIS which is a business/CS mix, but again that's not where my passion lies so I can't help Riot here. Now I know it seems like this post is to try to get a job at Riot and to be honest it is, but it's much easier for Riot to hire people from Cali. I was turned down their internship opportunities for exactly this reason, could also be that I'm not qualified either but what opportunities do I have to be qualified? A lot actually, but nothing worth putting on a resume. Only small scale organizations like in town gaming centers that eventually go out of business. I did have MLG opportunities in high school in 2006 but it was for Halo and I didn't respect how Bungie ignored MLG's efforts... Maybe I should have sucked it up.

Any way, I'm ranting to myself. THE REASON I MADE THIS POST is because I want any opinions on what I can do to get into the scene. I'll list things I've done so no one repeats anything.

  • Co-found a Collegiate Organization
  • Manage teams
  • Setup programs for my universities organization
  • Applied for eSports internship at Riot
  • Applied at Riot for eSports / Community positions, I would apply for more but I feel that's irrelevant to submit a resume multiple times
  • Reached out to Curse
  • Reached out to Solomid
  • Today I signed up at TeSPA to be the representative for my Univerity
[/LIST]
tl;dr I'm trying my best to get into eSports, it isn't working. I'm a senior. Suggestions on how to build a career towards eSports?


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leviadragon555

Senior Member

09-04-2013

You need to first off not be in platinum. Higher end of diamond or even challenger (getting into challenger would really boost your chances). Another thing is your win rate percentage and - but don't quote me here, I'm not 100% sure - you need to show that you can work with a 5-man team. This means make a team with 4 other people like you and then get to, again, the higher end of diamond or challenger even.

To be honest, I'm not 100% sure on any of this, but they all sound like logical requirements so I figured I'd share at the very least. I don't have much time so I can't reread your post and I skimmed through the first time, but if you don't have any, then you're going to need a background in League gaming. Like, tournaments and whatnot. They can be small scale, but I'd imagine you'd need a bunch - with you and your team winning those, mind you. And I guess to move up in the pro scene as well, like advancing your team from small tournaments to bigger and bigger ones as time goes on.

Again, don't quote me, as not all of this has to be right. I don't know how it all works honestly. I just tried to think of everything that would make sense and share.

Good luck, bud.


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A Real Hero

Junior Member

09-04-2013

My team is a collegiate level team. Also most kids trying to become good just solo q. Like my brother goes to my school and is D1 but he doesn't want to be on the team bc the only other good candidates are plat and gold and 1/2 of the candidates are not try hard.

So I'm trying to go the route where I don't have to stop everything I'm doing and become a player. I mean I'm getting a business degree so I have at least basic requirements to be a manger of some sort.

Thank you for your input though. I have considered the route my brother is doing.

btw is account is "dooster"


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A Real Hero

Junior Member

09-04-2013

@RiotTiza maybe a comment from you ?


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RiotTiza

This user has referred a friend to League of Legends, click for more information

eSports Coordinator

09-06-2013
1 of 2 Riot Posts

One of the characteristics of the esports scene is that there's way more demand than supply, mostly because of the explosive growth in the community in the last few years. As such, esports is pretty unforgiving to people who try to work their way through other organizations. Even Riot's esports team, despite growing fast, is still pretty small. A career in esports is nearly as difficult to obtain as a career as a pro player, so make sure you keep you backup plan rolling (which you're doing by obtaining a business degree).

The best way to "get involved" is to do it yourself. With so many people wanting to play and get involved, it's surprising easy to start from scratch. For me, I started hosting local events. Running a bare-bones esports tournament is pretty simple. Get signups, set basic rules, make sure the games start at the right time, and update the brackets. You'll know you can do better and do more... so you will for the next one. Start streaming. Advertise. Get casters. Get bigger prizes. Go regional or go online and start bringing in more attention. Up your quality bar and keep going.

If you're looking to focus on team management, tryhard players that want to be on a team are a dime a dozen. Pick 5-7 of them that you think can click well and just start going. You already have some experience, so use that to try and get a better collection of players that will mesh well and try hard. Set a practice schedule, and stick to it. Communicate expectations so everybody's on the same page and ready to listen to you. Find teams to scrim, or run two teams to scrim in-house. Find tournaments to enter - Go4LoLs are every weekend.

This is kind of rambly, so I'll stop here.

tl;dr There is no defined path, but there's tons of opportunity. Take what you know and strike off in a direction.


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Cliff Walrus

Senior Member

09-09-2013

Umm what? The entire supply/demand part of that is wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiotTiza View Post
One of the characteristics of the esports scene is that there's way more demand than supply, mostly because of the explosive growth in the community in the last few years.
Are you saying there is more demand than supply because there are not qualified people in the "supply"?
Not being qualified is part of what OP was asking. The comparison between pro players is actually the exact opposite. The demand is low but the supply is high. The number of teams that are even allowed into the LCS is limiting the demand. Plus even if demand was less limited, it would be exactly like racing. "Anybody can come out and race all you need is a driver, a car, and a pit crew" Meaning any LoL team (driver) with a manager (car) and a few sponsors (pit crew) could compete right? Except no, they have to qualify to get in and you are only keeping the top 4 teams for next season. While this does add some interesting elements/pressure for people to watch who makes the cut; the league doesn't grow. The seasons are barely long enough for the rosters and standings to change (compared to other sports). Again I'm not saying its all bad because, I like the shorter season where each win/loss means more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiotTiza View Post
As such, esports is pretty unforgiving to people who try to work their way through other organizations.
Wat. Does. This. Even. Mean?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiotTiza View Post
The best way to "get involved" is to do it yourself.
Option 1: start your own LAN it'll be as big as MLG in no time.
Option 2: manage a team and get into the LCS
I'm not sure how to phrase this exactly, but uhh that is the worst advice I've ever read. Option 1, if it even grows past the point of being able to host it in the dorms. And he needs to contact the college to rent a big room for a while. He is going to probably go broke furnishing stuff because sponsors don't give you enough, then there is the room rental fee from the college. Now you can either charge people to get in which will drop attendance or eat the cost and hope it grows. What's likely to happen is it will grow for a while then drop off because the sponsored prizes are stuff like a mouse/t-shirt/mouse pad. You know stuff they give away for free at other cons. After helping set up Virginia Tech LAN with a few friends we handed it over (honestly not sure who runs it now) because the prizes never got better and new sponsors weren't interested in giving us stuff. Enjoy the cost of buying the networking equipment you'll need for 50 people to give them Nvidia posters and one lucky person gets a razor copperhead, and if you do a multi-game con you can win the game you just had a competition for!!

Option 2: well just have fun with that one its super easy.


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FosterTheChamps

Senior Member

09-09-2013

Did you just tell an E-Sports coordinator that he was wrong about e-sports?......


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Eninya

Senior Member

09-09-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterTheChamps View Post
Did you just tell an E-Sports coordinator that he was wrong about e-sports?......
It's not like it's a first.


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RiotTiza

This user has referred a friend to League of Legends, click for more information

eSports Coordinator

09-10-2013
2 of 2 Riot Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Walrus View Post
Umm what? The entire supply/demand part of that is wrong.

Are you saying there is more demand than supply because there are not qualified people in the "supply"?
Not being qualified is part of what OP was asking. The comparison between pro players is actually the exact opposite. The demand is low but the supply is high. The number of teams that are even allowed into the LCS is limiting the demand. Plus even if demand was less limited, it would be exactly like racing. "Anybody can come out and race all you need is a driver, a car, and a pit crew" Meaning any LoL team (driver) with a manager (car) and a few sponsors (pit crew) could compete right? Except no, they have to qualify to get in and you are only keeping the top 4 teams for next season. While this does add some interesting elements/pressure for people to watch who makes the cut; the league doesn't grow. The seasons are barely long enough for the rosters and standings to change (compared to other sports). Again I'm not saying its all bad because, I like the shorter season where each win/loss means more.
We're talking from an organizer/manager perspective. OP isn't trying to become a pro player. More people want to play in tournaments than there are tournaments to play in. We're agreeing on this point =)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Walrus View Post
Wat. Does. This. Even. Mean?
The main esports organizations don't hire many people compared to the number of people who want to get involved. It's better for you to start building experience from other avenues, primarily self-run events, while you have a steady source of income from something else (which is why I mentioned that it's good that he's finishing his degree).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Walrus View Post
I'm not sure how to phrase this exactly, but uhh that is the worst advice I've ever read. Option 1, if it even grows past the point of being able to host it in the dorms. And he needs to contact the college to rent a big room for a while. He is going to probably go broke furnishing stuff because sponsors don't give you enough, then there is the room rental fee from the college. Now you can either charge people to get in which will drop attendance or eat the cost and hope it grows. What's likely to happen is it will grow for a while then drop off because the sponsored prizes are stuff like a mouse/t-shirt/mouse pad. You know stuff they give away for free at other cons. After helping set up Virginia Tech LAN with a few friends we handed it over (honestly not sure who runs it now) because the prizes never got better and new sponsors weren't interested in giving us stuff. Enjoy the cost of buying the networking equipment you'll need for 50 people to give them Nvidia posters and one lucky person gets a razor copperhead, and if you do a multi-game con you can win the game you just had a competition for!!

Option 2: well just have fun with that one its super easy.
I didn't say that you should build the local LAN center into a $10k pro match, but to hone your skills there and look for a way to move forward.

Running an online tournament is painless and can be done for completely free. Some colleges offer clubs monetary budgets, some colleges charge for rooms. You can charge a small entry fee to cover basic room expenses, have BYOC events to spare you hardware costs, etc. General knowledge about fundraising is basically everywhere- school booster clubs, Rotary Club, Boy Scouts, youth sports- everybody needs money, so advice on building funds for small-scale stuff is a Google away. If you can demonstrate your growth, you can get larger groups to sign on to help, from local LAN centers to a school to esports-oriented tech companies.

Getting into esports in any capacity is tough, but plenty of people are building smaller communities from the ground up and it's showing. MLG started as a garage company. IvyLoL and Collegiate StarLeague came from some college students who wanted to compete just for the sake of it. Just because you didn't build a local college LAN into a blockbuster doesn't mean independent esports is dead - it means that sometimes you have to go somewhere else to keep going, or try something different to mix it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterTheChamps View Post
Did you just tell an E-Sports coordinator that he was wrong about e-sports?......
Appreciate the sentiment, but people are people, and people can be wrong.


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Vortex IV

Senior Member

09-10-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Real Hero View Post
So here I am in my senior year of college getting a degree where I can easily earn a more than sustainable income upon graduating.
Haha, reality is waiting for you kid.


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