@Lyte: A small concern about the Tribunal

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YoshioPeePee

Senior Member

04-05-2013

it makes sense that players who are active in tribunal are reported less

the more you are exposed to instances of people being jerks, the better you know what ticks other players off, so it's easier for you to avoid the patterns (and the key phrases that will trigger reports and punish votes and to reflect on and adjust your own attitude during games)

so it might be a chicken and the egg thing: do people who are less toxic more attracted to doing the tribunal or does doing tribunal make you less toxic? or both?


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piepiepiepiepi47

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Senior Member

04-05-2013

gg lyte too stronk


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davin

Senior User Researcher

04-05-2013
3 of 12 Riot Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyte View Post
This data is extremely critical because it suggests that the players that are voting in the Tribunal are your everyday players who want to make a difference in the community. More importantly, when we see data that Tribunal cases with homophobic slurs/racial slurs are among the most highly punished cases in the entire system, it suggests that the everyday players who play League are pretty awesome people.
Echoing times a billion. This is maybe my favorite nugget of data that has emerged from recent work. People are pretty cool.


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Commando Slap

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Senior Member

04-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyte View Post
This is a common misunderstanding of the Tribunal. Many players have said, "Well, Tribunal can't possibly work because the players voting are toxic themselves." But, the data shows this is simply not true.

We recently showed some data about this at MIT (the video and slides should be available shortly); basically, the data suggests that the players who vote in the Tribunal are a random sample of the population and the majority of the players are not toxic. In fact, the Tribunal population receives about 3% fewer reports per game than a random sample of the active playerbase, and over 20% fewer reports per game than a sample of players that are punished by the Tribunal.

This data is extremely critical because it suggests that the players that are voting in the Tribunal are your everyday players who want to make a difference in the community. More importantly, when we see data that Tribunal cases with homophobic slurs/racial slurs are among the most highly punished cases in the entire system, it suggests that the everyday players who play League are pretty awesome people.
Will you provide us with a link to them when they're available?

I love stuff like this.


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Lyte

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Lead Social Systems Designer

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04-05-2013
4 of 12 Riot Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by YoshioPeePee View Post
so it might be a chicken and the egg thing: do people who are less toxic more attracted to doing the tribunal or does doing tribunal make you less toxic? or both?
This is an interesting question, but one that's more difficult to tease out in the data.


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adolfnipple

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Senior Member

04-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyte View Post
This is a common misunderstanding of the Tribunal. Many players have said, "Well, Tribunal can't possibly work because the players voting are toxic themselves." But, the data shows this is simply not true.

We recently showed some data about this at MIT (the video and slides should be available shortly); basically, the data suggests that the players who vote in the Tribunal are a random sample of the population and the majority of the players are not toxic. In fact, the Tribunal population receives about 3% fewer reports per game than a random sample of the active playerbase, and over 20% fewer reports per game than a sample of players that are punished by the Tribunal.

This data is extremely critical because it suggests that the players that are voting in the Tribunal are your everyday players who want to make a difference in the community. More importantly, when we see data that Tribunal cases with homophobic slurs/racial slurs are among the most highly punished cases in the entire system, it suggests that the everyday players who play League are pretty awesome people.
Why not use the entire playerbase that is punished by the tribunal instead of a sample against the entire tribunal population? It seems a bit skewed to have a sample population against an entirety population.

Also what are the average games played and type of the normal tribunal user? I'm not trying to be negative, but you can easily shift the bias of statistics to validate your point by withholding certain segments of information or using selection criteria that benefits yourself.


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RicketCrack

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Member

04-05-2013

@Lyte

I see you posting in this thread, go look at my @Lyte thread >.>

http://na.leagueoflegends.com/board/...1#post36420477


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Retui

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Senior Member

04-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyte View Post
This is a common misunderstanding of the Tribunal. Many players have said, "Well, Tribunal can't possibly work because the players voting are toxic themselves." But, the data shows this is simply not true.

We recently showed some data about this at MIT (the video and slides should be available shortly); basically, the data suggests that the players who vote in the Tribunal are a random sample of the population and the majority of the players are not toxic. In fact, the Tribunal population receives about 3% fewer reports per game than a random sample of the active playerbase, and over 20% fewer reports per game than a sample of players that are punished by the Tribunal.

This data is extremely critical because it suggests that the players that are voting in the Tribunal are your everyday players who want to make a difference in the community. More importantly, when we see data that Tribunal cases with homophobic slurs/racial slurs are among the most highly punished cases in the entire system, it suggests that the everyday players who play League are pretty awesome people.
Could you link when they are available? I would like to see.


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BrohannesJahms

Senior Member

04-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by YoshioPeePee View Post
it makes sense that players who are active in tribunal are reported less

the more you are exposed to instances of people being jerks, the better you know what ticks other players off, so it's easier for you to avoid the patterns (and the key phrases that will trigger reports and punish votes and to reflect on and adjust your own attitude during games)

so it might be a chicken and the egg thing: do people who are less toxic more attracted to doing the tribunal or does doing tribunal make you less toxic? or both?
I can only speak for myself, obviously, but I participate in Tribunal because I want to make a positive difference in the community. I like interacting with other players, and removing trolls from the playerbase means that interactions are likely to be net more positive.


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Ding an Sich

Senior Member

04-05-2013

Quote:
Originally Posted by Retui View Post
Could you link when they are available? I would like to see.

Try to follow his twitter, he links alot of this stuff on there.